Intimate Encounters: Filipina Women and the Remaking of Rural Japan

By Lieba Faier | Go to book overview

Notes

INTRODUCTION

1. “Central Kiso” is not an officially recognized region. It is the name I have given to a cluster of mountain towns and villages in Kiso County that includes the towns of Kisofukushima and Agematsu and several nearby villages.

2. In Tagalog, ate is a title or term of address, meaning “elder sister.” It is used to show respect not only by younger siblings to older ones, but also among cousins, neighbors, and other members of one’s community or group.

3. For historical discussions of kokusai kekkon in Japan see Higurashi (1989), Kelsky (2001), Koshiro (1999), and Shukuya (1988).

4. I identify Japanese words with “Jpn.” and Tagalog words with “Tg.”

5. By discourse I mean, following Michel Foucault (1977a), a configuration of statements and practices through which something can be identified and known. A discourse is a social formation that produces the very object of knowledge that it claims to represent. It does this by establishing the language and conditions (what I call the “terms”) through which this object can be identified. A discourse is also a site for the production of subjectivities that works by delimiting the terms of possibility for certain modes of being.

6. Bakhtin (1981a: 284).

7. A dialogic approach to encounters differs from those that use transactional models (Thomas 1991) or focus dialectically on the transformation of selfcontained structures of culture (Sahlins 1981, 1985). As I explain later, I am interested in the intimate and interactive dynamics through which cultural ideas and practices come to be knowable and relationally formed. Dialogic processes may include forms of “transculturation” in which a disadvantaged group selectively borrows cultural ideas from another (Ortiz 1995; Pratt 1992); however, they cannot be reduced to this practice. See Meyler (1997) for a discussion of how Bakhtin’s notion (1981a) of the dialogic differs from a dialectical approach.

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