GLOSSARY

ALBINO: An individual characterized by a lack of pigment in the skin, hair, and/or eyes as the result of a disruption in the synthesis of melanin. The main forms of albinism are ocular (affecting only the eyes) and oculocutaneous (affecting the eyes, skin, and hair).

AUSTRALOPITHECINE: Referring to the ancient hominid genus Australopithecus or to a grade of early hominids preceding the genus Homo. The so-called robust australopithecines are distinguished by having larger teeth and a more heavily built jaw structure than the species known as gracile australopithecines.

BIPEDALISM: The ability to stand or walk on two legs rather than four (quadrupedalism). Humans exhibit habitual bipedalism—that is, they stand and walk on two legs all the time. Habitual bipedalism evolved independently in several lineages of vertebrates, including the ancestors of certain lizards and dinosaurs and the ancestors of birds and humans.

CATARRHINE: Referring to the Catarrhini, the infraorder of primates containing the Old World monkeys, apes, and humans.

CICATRISATION: Incising the skin in order to produce decorative scarring, some-

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Skin: A Natural History
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Illustrations ix
  • Acknowledgments xi
  • Preface xv
  • Introduction 1
  • 1 - Skin Laid Bare 9
  • 2 - History 21
  • 3 - Sweat 39
  • 4 - Skin and Sun 56
  • 5 - Skin’s Dark Secret 65
  • 6 - Color 76
  • 7 - Touch 97
  • 8 - Emotions, Sex, and Skin 112
  • 9 - Wear and Tear 121
  • 10 - Statements 141
  • 11 - Future Skin 164
  • Glossary 175
  • Notes 181
  • References 217
  • Index 243
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