Spectacle of Deformity: Freak Shows and Modern British Culture

By Nadja Durbach | Go to book overview

NOTES

INTRODUCTION

1. “A Collection of Handbills, Newspaper Cuttings, and Other Items, 1820–96,” G.R.2.5.7, opposite 24, Guildhall Library.

2. “Freak, n.1,” Oxford English Dictionary, 2d ed., 1989, OED Online, Oxford University Press, 25 July 2008, http://dictionary.oed.com.tproxy01.lib.utah.edu/ cgi/entry/50089602; Robert Aguirre, Informal Empire (Minneapolis: University of Minnesota, 2005), 107; Marlene Tromp and Karyn Valerius, “Introduction” to Victorian Freaks: The Social Context of Freakery in Britain, ed. Marlene Tromp (Columbus: Ohio State University Press, 2008), 1.

3. Laura Lunger Knoppers and Joan B. Landes, eds., Monstrous Bodies/ Political Monstrosities in Early Modern Europe (Ithaca, NY: Cornell University Press, 2004); Kathryn M. Brammall, “Monstrous Metamorphosis: Nature, Morality, and the Rhetoric of Monstrosity in Tudor England,” Sixteenth Century Journal 27(1) (1996): 3–21; Jorge Flores, “Distant Wonders: The Strange and the Marvelous Between Mughal India and Habsburg Iberia in the Early Seventeenth Century,” Comparative Studies in Society and History 49(3) (2007): 553–81; Kevin Stagg, “Representing Physical Difference: The Materiality of the Monstrous,” in Social Histories of Disability and Deformity, ed. David M. Turner and Kevin Stagg (London: Routledge, 2006), 19–38; Julie Crawford, Marvelous Protestantism: Monstrous Births in Post-Reformation England (Baltimore, MD: Johns Hopkins University Press, 2005).

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