The Essential Poetry of Bohdan Ihor Antonych: Ecstasies and Elegies

By Bohdan Ihor Antonych; Michael M. Naydan | Go to book overview

AUTUMN

The long days ripen like spring apples,
leaves stream from the lindens,
the creak of a wagon flows,
the cry of a finch pours out in a circle near the forest.

The deck of the sky burns at sunset,
from a flock in the aftergrass,
grayish-blue gloom,
in the manger of a ravine a bright aster irritates a hawk.
A drunken piano on the pianoforte of the grass
the wind began to play.
Unequal days ripen all the less
the cocks crow come midnight
and
prickly plants, black poplars
the swarm of wasps
and there
it’s already autumn
and
o
autumn
tumn
mn.

-170-

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The Essential Poetry of Bohdan Ihor Antonych: Ecstasies and Elegies
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page 3
  • Contents 7
  • Acknowledgments 11
  • A Note on the Translation 13
  • A Biographical Sketch of the Poet 15
  • Between Creation and the Apocalypse- The Poetry of Bohdan Ihor Antonych 21
  • I - From the Collection the Grand Harmony (1932–1933) 41
  • Musica Noctis 43
  • De Morte I 44
  • Ars Poetica II, 1 45
  • Liber Peregrinorum 3 46
  • II - From the Collection Three Rings- Long Poems and Lyrics (1934) 47
  • Self-Portrait 49
  • Three Rings 50
  • An Elegy about a Singing Door 51
  • An Elegy about the Keys to Love 56
  • An Elegy about the Ring of a Song 59
  • The Wedding 62
  • The Country Tavern 63
  • To the Wind 64
  • A Landscape from a Window 65
  • Goblets 66
  • A Prince 67
  • Maples 68
  • The Village 69
  • Christmas 70
  • Kolyada 4 71
  • The Green Gospel 72
  • Primordial Summer 73
  • The Snake 75
  • The Forest 76
  • An Elegy on the Ring of Night 77
  • The Night 79
  • A Late Hour 80
  • Morning 81
  • The Arrow 82
  • Bitter Wine 83
  • A Bitter Night 84
  • A Night on St. George’s Square 85
  • III - From the Collection the Book of the Lion (1936) 87
  • The Sign of the Lion 89
  • Daniel in the Lion’s Den 90
  • Ballad about the Prophet Jonah an Apocrypha 92
  • A Song about the Light before Time 95
  • The Samaritan Woman by the Well 96
  • Six Strophes of Mysticism 97
  • Roses 98
  • Carnations 99
  • Peonies 100
  • Tulips 101
  • Violets 102
  • A Monumental Landscape 103
  • The Square of Angels 104
  • Apocalypse 105
  • Starlion; or the Constellation of the Lion 106
  • Magicopolis; or How Myths Are Born 107
  • Sands 108
  • The Round Dance 109
  • A Song on the Indestructibility of Matter 110
  • Prayer to the Stars 111
  • Red Taffeta 112
  • The Tale 4 of a Black Regiment 113
  • IV - From the Collection the Green Gospel (1938) 115
  • First Chapter of All Phenomena, the Most Wondrous Is Existence 117
  • An Invitation 118
  • To the Beings from a Green Star 119
  • An Ecstatic Eight-Strophe Poem 120
  • First Lyric Intermezzo 121
  • The First Chapter of the Bible 122
  • Two Hearts 123
  • A Portrait of a Carpenter 124
  • The Fair 125
  • Second Chapter 126
  • The Sign of the Oak 127
  • Duet 128
  • The Garden (a Biological Poem in Two Variants) 129
  • Second Lyric Intermezzo 130
  • A Bird Cherry Poem 131
  • A Sermon to the Fish 132
  • Carp 133
  • Spring 134
  • Cherry Trees 135
  • Third Chapter 136
  • Goldsea 137
  • The Fleece 138
  • A Prayer for the Souls of Drowned Girls 139
  • Ambassadors of the Night 140
  • To a Proud Plant, That Is, to Myself 141
  • The Lady of Diamonds 142
  • The Home beyond a Star 144
  • V - From the Collection Rotations (1938) 145
  • Rotations 147
  • Cities and Muses 148
  • Ballad of the Alley 149
  • Forever 151
  • A Ballad on Azure Death 152
  • The Bottom of Silence 153
  • The End of the World 154
  • The Concert from Mercury 155
  • Dead Automobiles 156
  • Trumpets of the Last Day 157
  • Ending 158
  • VI - From Poetry Not Published in Collections 159
  • A Lviv Elegy 161
  • Green Faith 162
  • A Prayer 163
  • VII - From the Collection a Welcome to Life (1931) 165
  • The Mad Fish 167
  • The Stratosphere 168
  • The Bee 169
  • Autumn 170
  • About a Strophe 171
  • Autobiography 172
  • A Welcome to Life 173
  • General Index 175
  • Index of Poem Titles in English 177
  • Index of Poem Titles in Latin and Ukrainian 179
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