What Is Social-Scientific Criticism?

By John H. Elliott | Go to book overview

Appendix 3

DATA INVENTORY FOR DIACHRONIC ANALYSIS OF
SOCIAL-HISTORICAL PHASES AND TRENDS
1.Analysis and synthesis of macrosocietal phases and trends
1.Identification and justification of appropriate theory, models, and research design for analyzing these phases and trends
1.2.Identification of discrete phases and criteria of demarcation (e.g., imperial reigns; procurator tenures in the provinces; phases of Herodian rule in Palestine; local calendars; specific events (death of Jesus, Stephen, James; call of Paul; first Jewish-Roman war; destruction of Jerusalem and temple; etc.)
1.3.Synchronic analysis and synthesis of each discrete phase (Appendix 2)
1.4.Identification of changes and trends ensuing from one phase to another, including consideration of internal and external interlocking conditioning factors (environmental, economic, social, political, cultural); major agents and networks; instrumentalities; relations of power; systemic contradictions; predominant causes, effects, consequences
1.5.Explanation of 1.3 and 1.4 through testing of models adopted in 1.1
2.Analysis and synthesis of microsocietal phases and trends of the early Christian movement
2.1.Identification and justification of appropriate theory, models, and research design for analyzing microsocietal group movements (and Christianity in particular). See Blasi (1988:2–11) regarding basic features of a social movement and Christianity as a social movement
2.1.1.Evaluation of models of social movements (including their specific aims and salient features; conditioning factors [environmental, economic, social, political, cultural]; agencies; instrumentalities for managing conflict; life span; etc.) and their appropriateness for modeling early Christianity
2.1.1.1.Repristination movements
2.1.1.2.Revitalization movements
2.1.1.3.Reform movements

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What Is Social-Scientific Criticism?
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Foreword ix
  • Introduction- Two Scenarios 1
  • 1 - What Is Social-Scientific Criticism? 7
  • 2 - Why the Need for Social-Scientific Criticism? 9
  • 3 - The Recent Emergence of Social-Scientific Criticism 17
  • 4 - The Method in Operation- Presuppositions 36
  • 5 - The Method in Operation- Procedures 60
  • 6 - Critical Assessments 87
  • 7 - Achievements and Contributions 101
  • Appendix 1 107
  • Appendix 2 110
  • Appendix 3 122
  • Appendix 4 124
  • Glossary 127
  • Abbreviations 136
  • Bibliographies 138
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