Making New York Dominican: Small Business, Politics, and Everyday Life

By Christian Krohn-Hansen | Go to book overview

Introduction

It was a hot Tuesday afternoon in late August 2002, and I was in La Nueva España, a small restaurant on 207th Street in Inwood, at the northernmost point of Manhattan. The restaurant, owned and run by a Dominican, served mainly Dominican food, and most of the guests were first- and second- generation Dominican immigrants. The man sitting with me at the table was the reason I had come. These days La Nueva España functioned as his regular café. He was a friend of the owner and lived with a sister in a tenement around the corner. José Delio Marte was a Dominican immigrant who had arrived in New York City in 1965, at eighteen.1 While his first jobs in New York had been factory jobs in midtown, he had spent most of the last thirty- seven years as an owner and operator of small businesses, mostly bodegas, small, Spanish- speaking Dominican neighborhood or street- corner grocery stores, in Upper Manhattan. During these years, he had seen the city and northern Manhattan change conspicuously: he had seen the Dominican community emerge.

I had met with him for the first time a couple of weeks previously. Then as now, I had asked him to tell me about the Dominican immigration to the city and about the creation and the construction of New York’s Dominican community. I had asked him to tell me why, and how, he and so many other Dominican immigrants had ended up in small businesses— taxicab operations, neighborhood grocery stores, restaurants, travel agencies, beauty parlors, carrepair shops, small and medium- sized supermarkets, and other enterprises.

One of Inwood’s busiest commercial streets is 207th Street. This short stretch on the northern tip of Manhattan has two subway stations, one for the 1 train on Tenth Avenue, and one for the A train on Broadway. Next to La Nueva España was a McDonalds. A few of the businesses on 207th Street were owned by Americans of Arab ancestry, and a couple were Mexican, but the great majority were run by Dominicans. The language on the sidewalks and in the stores was Spanish, and most of the livery cabs that cruised the neighborhood were owned and driven by Dominicans. Inwood was dominated

-1-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Making New York Dominican: Small Business, Politics, and Everyday Life
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Introduction 1
  • Part - I 29
  • Chapter 1 - From Quisqueya to New York City 31
  • Chapter 2 - Origin Stories 47
  • Part II 91
  • Chapter 3 - From Bodegas to Supermarkets 93
  • Chapter 4 - From Livery Cabs to Black Cars 134
  • Part III 171
  • Chapter 5 - Dominicans and Hispanics 173
  • Chapter 6 - Up against the Big Money 201
  • Chapter 7 - In Search of Dignity 230
  • Conclusion 264
  • Notes 269
  • References 285
  • Index 299
  • Acknowledgments 310
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 312

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.