Making New York Dominican: Small Business, Politics, and Everyday Life

By Christian Krohn-Hansen | Go to book overview

Conclusion

The history of the Dominicanization of New York is not primarily a history of the extremes— of flagrant failures and striking successes, dramatic defeats and great victories. It is, rather, marked by many shades of gray, but also by a good deal of hope, not to speak of patience. It has above all been created through forms of work and leisure, forms of household and family life, through forms of schooling, and forms of politics.

In the 1960s and 1970s, a significant proportion of the Dominican immigrants in the city found work in industry— but far from all were factory workers. Subsequently, the proportion working in industry declined. Instead, a growing proportion sought to survive partly through wage employment in the service sector and partly through forms of entrepreneurship, that is, running one’s own business. But even after the 1990s, or the year 2000, a good many were still employed in New York and New Jersey factories. In any case, the great majority of the city’s Dominicans have, like so many others in the post- 1960s United States, made only modest sums. Ordinary wages have been, and continue to be, low or miserable. (Yet, as Ramona Hernández wrote some years ago, “What Dominicans [on the island] know for sure is that the adventure of emigrating, whatever the perils involved, represents the possibility of hope. For them, the potential to improve their lot is likely to be more appealing than staying home, where the alternatives for socioeconomic progress are slim”; 2002: 183.) Dominican New Yorkers who have run their own businesses have typically not made big profits but, rather, have primarily managed to survive. A tiny minority have experienced fabulous economic success. Not a few have failed spectacularly. A number have ended in the underground economy or become criminals. Some— after 1996, an increasing number— have been deported to the Dominican Republic.1 But many Dominicans have gradually become Americanized, and a growing number have become Americans, obtaining U.S. citizenship.

In his Black Corona, Steven Gregory seeks with success to examine and write about the lives of a group of African Americans in a part of New York

-264-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Making New York Dominican: Small Business, Politics, and Everyday Life
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Introduction 1
  • Part - I 29
  • Chapter 1 - From Quisqueya to New York City 31
  • Chapter 2 - Origin Stories 47
  • Part II 91
  • Chapter 3 - From Bodegas to Supermarkets 93
  • Chapter 4 - From Livery Cabs to Black Cars 134
  • Part III 171
  • Chapter 5 - Dominicans and Hispanics 173
  • Chapter 6 - Up against the Big Money 201
  • Chapter 7 - In Search of Dignity 230
  • Conclusion 264
  • Notes 269
  • References 285
  • Index 299
  • Acknowledgments 310
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 312

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.