Ms. Mentor's New and Ever More Impeccable Advice for Women and Men in Academia

By Emily Toth | Go to book overview

Are You the Retiring Type?

Q: When I started out in this profession, during the Vietnam War, I was young and brash and knew you couldn’t trust anyone over thirty. I was the same age as Janis Joplin, and I somehow thought I’d die before I grew old. Instead I’m nearly sixty-five, just like Mick Jagger. My contemporaries are retiring, and I’m wondering if I should also be heading toward the glue factory. How do I know when it’s time?

A: Ms. Mentor’s readers may think she gets many letters like this from mature academics wanting to know when to hold and when to fold. But Ms. Mentor admits that she created this letter herself, so that she could pontificate about retirement. Not one of her sage correspondents has ever brought it up.

Still, it crouches like an elephant in the middle of the floor at countless faculty meetings about five-year plans and “the future of the department.” Thanks to buyouts, phased retirements, and other ingenious fiduciary maneuvers, many departments are now heavy with those who are half-in, half-out—still teaching, still holding tenured slots, but not committed to the future. Some are dedicated; some are grumblers (“Didn’t we do all that in 1972?”); many are invisible.

But those curmudgeons are not Ms. Mentor’s subjects. Nor are those who retire for health reasons, or because their bank accounts are exceptionally healthy. The Caesars (the precise planners) are far less interesting to Ms. Mentor than the Cleopatras (queens of denial).

Ms. Mentor believes that her fictitious correspondent should retire right now if she has a passionate pursuit. Many retirees want to travel, or

-238-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Ms. Mentor's New and Ever More Impeccable Advice for Women and Men in Academia
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Preface ix
  • The Petty and the Profound What They Write to Ms. Mentor 1
  • Stewing in Graduate School 9
  • Foraging for an Academic Job 43
  • Love and Sex in Academia 68
  • You’re Hired! Early Years in a Strange New World 94
  • The Fine and Quirky Art of Teaching 123
  • Working and Playing Well with Others 146
  • Questions Great and Small 175
  • Adjuncts 194
  • The Tenure Trek 207
  • What Is Life after Tenure? 230
  • Are You the Retiring Type? 238
  • Daring to Create Your Own Life 242
  • Ms. Mentor’s Exemplary Bibliography 247
  • Index 257
  • Acknowledgments 266
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 269

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.