Ms. Mentor's New and Ever More Impeccable Advice for Women and Men in Academia

By Emily Toth | Go to book overview

Ms. Mentor’s Exemplary Bibliography

Note to Sage Readers: Ms. Mentor continues to be an eclectic and indefatigable reader of all that is great and wise, especially in book form. She also whizzes about on the Internet, where she reads many excellent blogs. But she shall not recommend any here, lest she inspire jealousy, wrath, and grade appeals.

For extra credit, Ms. Mentor directs eager readers to the bibliography in her first tome, Ms. Mentor’s Impeccable Advice for Women in Academia. This bibliography continues that noble work, together with a similar warning that if a book is not listed here, it may not have made itself known to Ms. Mentor. Or it may be no good.

Aisenberg, Nadya, and Mona Harrington. Women of Academe: Outsiders in the Sacred Grove. Amherst: University of Massachusetts Press, 1988.

Allitt, Patrick. I’m the Teacher, You’re the Student: A Semester in the University Classroom. Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press, 2005.

Amis, Kingsley. Lucky Jim. New York: Penguin, 1993.

Babcock, Linda, and Sarah Laschever. Women Dont Ask: Negotiation and the Gender Divide. Princeton: Princeton University Press, 2003.

Bain, Ken. What the Best College Teachers Do. Cambridge: Harvard University Press, 2004.

Barreca, Regina, and Deborah Denenholz Morse, eds. The Erotics of Instruction. Hanover, N.H.: University Press of New England, 1997.

Basalla, Susan, and Maggie Debelius. “So What Are You Going to Do

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Ms. Mentor's New and Ever More Impeccable Advice for Women and Men in Academia
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Preface ix
  • The Petty and the Profound What They Write to Ms. Mentor 1
  • Stewing in Graduate School 9
  • Foraging for an Academic Job 43
  • Love and Sex in Academia 68
  • You’re Hired! Early Years in a Strange New World 94
  • The Fine and Quirky Art of Teaching 123
  • Working and Playing Well with Others 146
  • Questions Great and Small 175
  • Adjuncts 194
  • The Tenure Trek 207
  • What Is Life after Tenure? 230
  • Are You the Retiring Type? 238
  • Daring to Create Your Own Life 242
  • Ms. Mentor’s Exemplary Bibliography 247
  • Index 257
  • Acknowledgments 266
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