Man and the Word: The Orations of Himerius

By Himerius; Robert J. Penella | Go to book overview

CHAPTER 4
Coming and Going
in Himerius’s School

Arrivals at and departures from Himerius’s school in Athens were often occasions for oratory. There are enough examples of Himerian oratory associated with such occasions to warrant examining them here as a group.

Four of the pieces (11, 30, 63, and 64) concern Himerius’s own comings and goings. The meager remains of Oration 11 are from a “syntactic” or farewell talk that he delivered to his pupils at Athens when he was about to depart for a visit to Corinth. We have a description of a syntactic oration in Menander Rhetor 2.15. One might imagine on the basis of Menander’s comments that in the essentially lost Oration 11 Himerius expressed distress at the thought of being separated from his pupils. He may have explained why he had to go to Corinth, at the same time wondering how he would be received there. He may have praised both Athens and Corinth. He probably prayed both for his pupils in Athens and for a safe voyage for himself.

Himerius delivered Orations 30, 63, and 64 upon returning to Athens, 30 upon returning from Corinth—whether this was the same visit that Oration 11 refers to is not clear—and 63 upon returning from a visit to his original homeland, Bithynian Prusias. Oration 64 gives no indication of where he had returned from when he delivered it. In Oration 30 he appropriately stresses the sadness he felt abroad, as he yearned for those

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Man and the Word: The Orations of Himerius
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • The Transformation of the Classical Heritage ii
  • Title Page v
  • Contents ix
  • Acknowledgments xi
  • Abbreviations xiii
  • Introduction 1
  • The Orations 17
  • Chapter 1 - Himerius’s Son, Rufinus 19
  • Chapter 2 - In Praise of Cities and of Men 34
  • Chapter 3 - In and around Himerius’s School 66
  • Chapter 4 - Coming and Going in Himerius’s School 107
  • Chapter 5 - The Epithalamium for Severus 141
  • Chapter 6 - Imaginary Orations 156
  • Chapter 7 - Orations Addressed to Roman Officials 207
  • Chapter 8 - Miscellaneous Remains 272
  • Arrangement of Orations and Concordance 279
  • Bibliography 283
  • Index 295
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