New Philadelphia: An Archaeology of Race in the Heartland

By Paul A. Shackel | Go to book overview

CHAPTER 4
From Grass Roots to a
National Movement

By the time we completed the walkover survey we realized we were at the beginning of something big. Artifacts found in discrete locations at the former town site were a good indication that archaeological remains could be found under the plow zone. The site was significant to the local community and descendants, and now it was potentially significant because of its archaeological value. At this point it was important to figure out a way to secure funding to do additional archaeology and research on the town.


CONGRESS TO ST. MARY’S CITY

Since the incorporation of the New Philadelphia Association in 1996 the organization had tried to increase awareness of the place and raise a significant amount of money to save New Philadelphia from future development. However, by 2003 the NPA had accumulated only a small amount of cash, enough to pay for incidentals but not enough to buy land. Phil Bradshaw remained adamant that he did not want to go to the local, state, or federal government for grants or for any other form of assistance. He believed that the government should not intervene in community affairs and that private citizens should raise the money to preserve the place. But this small nonprofit group made up of about a dozen people was running out of options. Approaching private foundations for support just led to more disappointment. The NPA believed

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