The Powerful Ephemeral: Everyday Healing in an Ambiguously Islamic Place

By Carla Bellamy | Go to book overview

Prologue

I was led to the collection of shrines in northwestern India known as Ḥusain Ṭekrī, or Husain Hill, much in the same way as most of its pilgrims: through a series of coincidences-events and circumstances and opportunities-that some would say were not coincidences at all.

During a year of language study in the Indian city of Udaipur I lived as a paying guest in the home of a woman named Maya. Maya is a married Sindhi Hindu woman in her late fifties or perhaps early sixties who lives in one of the many suburbs that sprawl along National Highway 8, a world away from the tourist enclaves and narrow alleys of the historic old city. I chose to live with Maya simply because her home was a stones throw from the language school, and, like all New Yorkers, I recognized the value of a short commute.

Maya’s home is that of a typical working-class family: a poured concrete structure with a flat roof built around a small, breezy central courtyard. On one side of the courtyard, stairs lead to a second-story bedroom and bathroom built with a son’s marriage in mind. Several months into my stay, however, it became clear that Maya’s seemingly typical home was atypical beyond its resident foreign lady with her exotic American accent and everpresent stack of Hindi flashcards. At dusk on Thursdays, I noticed a steady stream of people pass by the door of my rented room. Curious, I followed them one evening to the roof, where I discovered Maya seated in a small shrine replete with recognizably Islamic iconography: a panja1 and images of Zuljenah,2 a photo of a local, recently deceased Sufi named Mastān Bābā,3

-xvii-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Powerful Ephemeral: Everyday Healing in an Ambiguously Islamic Place
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 283

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.