The Powerful Ephemeral: Everyday Healing in an Ambiguously Islamic Place

By Carla Bellamy | Go to book overview

APPENDIX B
Ḥusain Ṭekrī Kyā Hai?

Ḥusain Ṭekrī Kyā Hai? (What is Ḥusain Ṭekrī?), a Hindi/Urdu guidebook for pilgrims, contains a recent version of Ḥusain Ṭekrīs origin story.


WHEN AND HOW WAS ḤUSAIN ṬEKRĪ MADE?

It has been more than one hundred years since Ḥusain Ṭekrī was established in the midst of dense jungle. When Ḥusain Ṭekrī wasn’t here, people were afraid of passing the place where it would be, since it was a dense jungle. But since the residence of the Prophet’s grandson Imām Husain came here, the jungle has become settled and crowds of people fill it from all sides. The sick, the incurable, and the troubled come here, and having become happy, they go.

The miracle of Ḥusain Ṭekrī happened on the tenth of Muharram, 1886. The ta‘ziya of Jaora was in the historic imāmbārā until the evening of the tenth of Muharram, when it was lifted and taken in the midst of a procession to Karbala. This ta‘ziya was commissioned with great purity and faith by Dādā Mukīm Khān [a brother of one of the nawābs of Jaora]. The ta‘ziya was fairly large and heavy, requiring the efforts of sixty to seventy men to lift it. In 1886 the ta‘ziya was in the imāmbārā, just as it always was. On the tenth of Muharram Rāmlīlā happened, and for this reason two processions were on the road at the same time-one the ta‘ziya and the other Rāmlīlā. But the ta‘ziya procession was at Phūti Baurī intersection, and the Hindu brothers couldn’t pass until the Muslim brothers went ahead. In those days it was very cold, and therefore the ta‘ziya bearers had set the ta‘ziya at the intersection and lit a fire to stay warm. But the excellent Hindus couldn’t advance until the ta‘ziya procession advanced, and for this reason the Hindus asked the Muslims to move the ta‘ziya procession away from the intersection. There were words between them. Knowing people thought, “God forbid this get out of hand.” Therefore, they decided to tell the whole story to the ruler of the kingdom, and to do as he said. Both

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