Facing Death: Theme and Variations

By F. David Martin | Go to book overview

IV
Recapitulation

Unless you know what it is, I ain’t never goin’ to be able to ’splain
it to you.

—Louis Armstrong

DURING THE LAST FEW YEARS, I HAVE LECTURED AND GIVEN COURSES ON a number of the issues raised by this study. Interesting questions have been asked.


1. What environment is most favorable for participative experi-
ences?

We need withdrawal from everything that weakens concentration with the participatory thing. To achieve understanding, we must focus on the one rather than the many, allowing the one to control the many. To think from anything, we must block distractions. Sometimes the hearing deficiency of the elderly has its compensation. Powerfully interesting things (events), such as a booming bronze sunset at the edge of the sea, may drown out noisy exclamations. But normally we must seek silence to gather in the little things, such as the splendor of the grass. “Still-born Silence that art Floodgate of the deeper heart” (Quaker book on Silent Worship). “We knock upon silence for an answering music” (Lu Chi), as John Cage explored (p. 88). Rilke:

Things.
When I say that word (do you hear?), there is silence;
the silence which surrounds things.

Silence is the harbinger and aura of the majestic mystery, for in its nothingness is awesomeness.

-112-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Facing Death: Theme and Variations
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page 3
  • Contents 7
  • Illustrations 9
  • Acknowledgments 11
  • I - Prelude 15
  • II - Theme- Facing Death 19
  • III - Variations 64
  • IV - Recapitulation 112
  • V - Coda 134
  • VI - Postlude- Participating and Perception 140
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 152

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.