Amigas y Amantes: Sexually Nonconforming Latinas Negotiate Family

By Katie L. Acosta | Go to book overview

CHAPTER 3
DOING FAMILY FROM
WITHIN INTERRACIAL/
INTERETHNIC
RELATIONSHIPS

As I write this chapter, there have been ongoing developments across the country regarding the rights of same-sex couples to marry. On October 10, 2008, Connecticut became the third state to allow same-sex couples to legally marry. Sylvia, a Connecticut resident in her early fifties and an immigrant from Cuba, took advantage of these developments and legally married her life partner of over fifteen years. Elena and Marta both married their partners several years earlier when Massachusetts made history as the first state to extend the institution of marriage to same-sex couples. When I interviewed Luisa, also a resident of Massachusetts, she was planning her wedding, which was scheduled for the summer of 2009. In 2011, New York also started allowing same-sex couples to marry, opening up the option for even more participants in this study. At the time of the data collection, all of the Latinas who were married or in the process of getting married were in relationships with white women. Thus, in deciding to marry, they are transcending heteronormative laws that have restricted marriage as only between a man and a woman, and they have joined heterosexual couples in transcending miscegenation laws that historically prohibited interracial couples from marrying. These women are among the many I interviewed who have crossed racial and sexual boundaries in their relationships.1 The participants had various partnership arrangements: some were legally married, some were in civil unions, and others have chosen to not involve the state in any aspect of their relationships, either by choice or because their undocumented status will not permit it. Despite differences in the formality of their relationships, these women shared a struggle to connect intimately with their partners on account of racial, ethnic, and cultural differences.

-61-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Amigas y Amantes: Sexually Nonconforming Latinas Negotiate Family
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 170

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.