Chapter 4
Prophecy

Anent that, think again about those freakish eggs, shaped like heads and served up to the royal valets in London.1 Their juxtaposition with the gruesome story of Hall’s execution effects a “tincture” that dyes the minor curiosity with the suggestion of violent death.2 What the real valets (if there were real valets) thought is irrecoverable, but the report implies that a weird portentousness afflicts the characters in Usk’s chronicle as much as it afflicts the chronicle itself: if Usk saw only one of the eggs, he was not present when they were served, but if he saw that one, then a valet carried it away—an untidy operation that bespeaks a sense of their significance. The previous chapter suggested that the conscious artistry of such uncanny moments means that they are not unconscious symptoms; but artistry on an imposing scale is precisely what we might suspect if Adam Usk’s secret is not his secret but history’s: the idea that future events are portentously foreshadowed by present ones implies they are designed.

The portent is a unit of enigmatic meaning, extensible into prophecy, and England saw a glut of both in Richard’s and Henry’s reigns.3 Portent is a common, though not an inevitable, component of chronicling; some scholars have incautiously suggested that its occasional appearance tells us about the task historiography expected itself to do; and it has been suggested that Usk’s use of portent and prophecy shows him shouldering this task with relish.4

-53-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Adam Usk's Secret
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Introduction 1
  • Chapter 1 - The First Secret 11
  • Chapter 2 - The Story of William Clerk 28
  • Chapter 3 - Fear 39
  • Chapter 4 - Prophecy 53
  • Chapter 5 - Utility 66
  • Chapter 6 - Grief 82
  • Chapter 7 - Theory of History 96
  • Chapter 8 - Adam Usk’s Secret 111
  • Conclusion 132
  • Abbreviations 143
  • Notes 145
  • Bibliography 193
  • Index 207
  • Acknowledgments 213
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 213

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.