Acknowledgments

This is a project of connection: I owe much to many links in the Great Chain of Coffee, such as Bonnie Slotnick who introduced me to Yoshinobu Majima who introduced me to Professor Maruo Shuzo, my guru and source for all things coffee. Maruo-sensei tirelessly sought answers to all my questions and inspired me with his commitment to excellence all the way from tree to bean to cup. His colleagues in coffee, Yamada-san, Tsuji-san, and many others, were also very generous and helpful. Fusako Shore and Tazuko Wada of the Kyoto Consortium were indispensable connectors too—leading me to wonderful venues all over Kyoto. Richard Dyck introduced me to coffee people and places from Tokyo to Ratanakiri, Cambodia, and always offered thoughtful commentary. Other Japan-based friends and colleagues, like Elaine and Jim Baxter, Charlie and Sawako Fox, Mike Molasky (whose work on jazz kissa is illuminating), and Henry and Kimi Smith, were willing to sip all over town with me.

Shiomi Noriko, Yamamoto Yoko, and Nakamura Sae, my most able and creative research assistants, helped me search into the corners of café history. And the cafés themselves provided inspiration, information, and a corner table where I could observe and write. Listing them all here would be impossible: I am grateful to call “home” the fourteen or so cafés that I haunted. Many appear in the guide in the appendix. Each deserves my singular commitment, and if I could have cloned myself, each would have had it. But I will mention here a few: Cafe Sagan, whose kind owners supported me and shared their time and experience and even loaned me a home roaster for my ill-judged experiments; Mo-An on the top of Kyoto’s Yoshida-yama was a place of serenity, beauty, and great scones; Otafuku, also in Kyoto, where Noda-san invited me to the counter; Tanaka-san’s roasting shop offered fine beans, lessons in hand-pouring, a comfortable chair, and coffee talk; the Jumpei coffee circle of craftspeople and artists showed me how a community and great talk can be nurtured with cups of coffee and plates of cake.

-205-

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