Mining the Home Movie: Excavations in Histories and Memories

By Karen L. Ishizuka; Patricia R. Zimmermann | Go to book overview

10 Something Strong Within
as Historical Memory

ROBERT ROSEN

Something Strong Within (1994), directed by Robert A. Nakamura and written and produced by Karen L. Ishizuka, is a documentary film that illuminates the stateside detention camps established by the U.S. government for Japanese Americans during World War II. Pursuant to an executive order by President Franklin D. Roosevelt, over 120,000 men, women, and children— two-thirds of whom were U.S. citizens by birth—were wrested from their homes and communities without due process of law. They were detained in quickly constructed camps at ten desolate sites across the United States for up to three years. The legal injustices, widespread racism, and legacy of personal humiliation left an indelible imprint on the Japanese American collective memory that has commanded the attention of film- and videomakers intent on setting the record straight. Nakamura and Ishizuka’s forty-minute video documentary is unique among these works in its total reliance on home movie footage shot contemporaneous to the event.

Something Strong Within poses a wide range of conceptual and theoretical questions of general interest to anyone concerned with the use of moving image materials as historical narrative. What constitutes historical memory? How is it created and disseminated? Who makes it? Who consumes it, and to what uses is it put? What qualities of moving image materials make them suitable, or unsuitable, for the expression of historical memory? How can amateur film and home movies be used for this purpose?

A film is the product of a complex process involving a diverse array of purposively motivated participants, whose intentions must be harmonized in order to convey a coherent message. A film that treats historical events is even more complex because its multiple creators are themselves products of diverse historical circumstances. And the work itself does not become relevant as historical memory until after its meaning has been consumed and

-107-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Mining the Home Movie: Excavations in Histories and Memories
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 333

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.