Rethinking Moundville and Its Hinterland

By Vincas P. Steponaitis; C. Margaret Steponaitis | Go to book overview

3
Long-Term Trends in the Making
and Materialization of Social Groups
at Moundville

GREGORY D. WILSON

The Moundville site has a highly structured spatial plan—a point made long ago by Peebles (1971, 1979) and later developed by Knight (1998, 2010, this volume). On a macro-community level, Knight (1998, this volume) has interpreted the rectangular distribution of paired earthen monuments at the site as indicating the presence of a number of ranked, corporate kin groups (figure 3.1). My ongoing research has documented evidence that Moundville community members employed a similar socio-spatial logic to establish their kin-based identities on a subclan or lineage level through the construction of spatially discrete residential groups (Wilson 2008: 87–90). Moreover, I also found that these residential groups were later replaced by small burial clusters that I interpreted as kin-group cemeteries (Wilson 2008: 90–92, 2010).

Collectively, these patterns lend themselves to the conclusion that Moundville consisted of a carefully structured arrangement of clans and subclans. This model of community organization is even more compelling in that it corresponds so closely with the ethnohistorically documented kinship systems and community patterns of American Indian groups who once occupied neighboring portions of the interior Southeast (Knight 1990: 10; Speck 1907; Swan 1855: 262; Swanton 1922, 1928a: 115–16, 1928b: 204–6; Wilson 2008).

On the basis of this highly structured community plan, it may be tempting to conceptualize Moundville in structuralist theoretical terms. Structural-functionalist perspectives emphasize the inherent stability and cohesion of societies. Accordingly, the different segments that constitute a society are viewed as well-integrated building blocks with particular

-44-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Rethinking Moundville and Its Hinterland
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 324

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.