Rethinking Moundville and Its Hinterland

By Vincas P. Steponaitis; C. Margaret Steponaitis | Go to book overview

5
Was There a Moundville
Medicine Society?

GEORGE E. LANKFORD

The site of Moundville has been linked in recent years to a specialized mortuary role. In their reassessment of more than a century of archaeological exploration of the site, Knight and Steponaitis (1998) concluded that, for many decades after the high point of its habitation around AD 1200, Moundville continued to be a place of interment far greater than its living population warranted. They suggested that Moundville became some sort of necropolis in its lengthy final stage before abandonment. Using a completely different approach—analysis of an iconographic cluster of Moundville ceramic designs—I completed a study in 1996 in which I found that a significant number of graphic motifs at Moundville were related to the myths and beliefs of the journey of souls after death (Lankford 2007a, 2007c).

The fact that two separate and different studies produced a focus on specialized mortuary activity at Moundville calls for further consideration. The hypothesis advanced by Knight and Steponaitis suggests that Moundville experienced a social transformation from vibrant community at a large and complex mound site to a sparsely populated sacred area for mortuary rites and burials—a necropolis. That putative transformation needs some explanation of its dynamics and the structures involved, particularly if other sites can be identified as having experienced a similar transformation. How does a thriving community become a necropolis?

In the past few years of work by scholars focused on the Mississippian art known by various names in the past, such as the Southeastern Ceremonial Complex, it has become increasingly clear that the regional centers where such imagery appears were far from passive recipients of other people’s creations. The local nature of art forms becomes emphasized with

-74-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Rethinking Moundville and Its Hinterland
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 324

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.