No Place for Grief: Martyrs, Prisoners, and Mourning in Contemporary Palestine

By Lotte Buch Segal | Go to book overview

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS

Writing this book has given me a profound sense of gratitude toward the people who have in different ways left their mark on my work. I wish to acknowledge each one, none more so than the women whose lives I have tried to describe in order to share their experience with my readers. All their names here are made up, as are the names of their villages, towns, or cities. I know, however, that they realize that this book is about them, their lives, and their relations. It is my hope that they accept my deep thanks for the time and trust they gave when letting me listen to their words, stay in their houses, and take part in their lives.

The time I spent in Palestine learning about these women’s lives was suffused by the engagement, curiosity and gestures of kindness by many people. Acknowledging individuals in Palestine by name may jeopardize trust and confidentiality, so if I have omitted a name here, it is out of such a concern. During my engagement with Palestine, both while living there and today, a number of individuals and organizations have welcomed me and contributed time, questions and constructive comments to my study. Among those I want to mention are the people at the Gaza Community Mental Health Program, who were not directly involved in my study but helped shape my questions about the gendering of the conflict, not least Marwa Abu Dayah and Abdel Hamid Afana. In the West Bank the organization I term the Prisoners’ Support Center kindly offered me a place from where to start my inquiry, and I could not have entered this field without their generous interest and support. They allowed me to be a part of and scrutinize aspects of their tireless and valuable work. Particularly I thank the group of young female therapists whose encouraging welcome inspired me to probe deeper with my study. Numerous individuals and agencies have engaged willingly in discussion about how to understand the effects of long-term conflict upon Palestinian men and women. At Birzeit University I had the pleasure of getting to know the work of Professors Rita Giacaman, Esmail Nashif, and Penny

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No Place for Grief: Martyrs, Prisoners, and Mourning in Contemporary Palestine
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Preface ix
  • Note on Transliteration x
  • Introduction 1
  • Chapter 1 - The Grammar of Suffering in Occupied Palestine 26
  • Chapter 2 - Domestic Uncanniness 48
  • Chapter 3 - Enduring Presents 81
  • Chapter 4 - On Hardship and Closeness 99
  • Chapter 5 - Solitude in Marriage 124
  • Chapter 6 - Enduring the Ordinary 143
  • Conclusion 167
  • Notes 177
  • References 183
  • Index 197
  • Acknowledgments 207
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