When the Fences Come Down: Twenty-First-Century Lessons from Metropolitan School Desegregation

By Genevieve Siegel-Hawley | Go to book overview

CHAPTER SIX
Education and the Regional Agenda

“Community” is attached to any number of definitions. Many emphasize groups with shared interests, concerns, and responsibilities. Some highlight fellowship; others talk about a sense of collectiveness. Though all contain crucial tie-ins to regional school desegregation, perhaps the most relevant comes from ecology. Here, “community” means “a group of interdependent organisms of different species growing and living together in a specified habitat.”1 This definition underscores the importance of recognizing how decisions made about the education of children in smaller parts of a community impact the education of children across the larger whole. More than ever before, the segregation and related inequalities that track along urban, suburban, and exurban lines means that we need to peer over existing fences to see into the shared space of a broadly defined community. Refusing to do so now jeopardizes our ability to grow and live together—successfully—in the future.

One of the central messages of When the Fences Come Down is the urgency of looking closely at the triumphs and failures of our recent past to better inform our unfolding present and not-too-distant future. The book seeks to recenter our gaze on what has been, for many years, a lost conversation about the benefits of city-suburban school desegregation— even as a deeply important dialogue has reemerged around the advantages of regionalism more generally. Given the myriad but largely forgotten advantages of metropolitan school desegregation, the momentum gathering behind regional equity movements related to jobs, housing, transportation, and the environment must expand to include education.

The story of our four metros demonstrates that efforts to eliminate the fences between city and suburban school districts, especially when they are accompanied by strong desegregation policy, bear important fruits. Yet our four regions also highlight the great reversal that takes place when city-suburban school desegregation efforts are abandoned, as well as the dangers of doing nothing in the face of deepening segregation.

This book is written for those who wish to think about how we might replicate, regain, or expand the opportunities presented by metropolitan school desegregation (which we will rebrand here with the twenty-firstcentury moniker “educational regionalism”). The following pages discuss

-133-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
When the Fences Come Down: Twenty-First-Century Lessons from Metropolitan School Desegregation
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 222

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.