Fight Pictures: A History of Boxing and Early Cinema

By Dan Streible | Go to book overview

Acknowledgments

This book could not have been completed without institutional support and the encouragement and advice of many generous colleagues and friends.

At the University of Texas at Austin, where this project began as a dissertation, I was fortunate to have encouraging mentors and a hearty cohort in the Department of Radio-Television-Film. Janet Staiger gave me scholarly guidance, detailed critiques, and constant support. Other teachers enriched my experience and education, particularly Tom Schatz, Charles Ramírez Berg, Joli Jensen, John Downing, Terry Todd, Lewis Gould, Horace Newcomb, Sharon Strover, Jan Todd, George C. Wright, and Bob Davis. I offer special thanks to my classmate, officemate, co-teacher, and rent-sharer Eric Schaefer for making the work lighter. Fellow UT RTF comrades who brightened the path include Mark Miller, Jim Wehmeyer, Eithne Johnson, Phil Riley, Tinky Weisblat, Lucila Vargas, Judi Hoffman, and Alison Macor.

A faculty-development research grant from the University of Wisconsin—Oshkosh allowed me to begin this book project. My gratitude to Jeff Lipschutz, Jeff Sconce, Karla Berry, and Michael Zimmerman.

The University of South Carolina’s College of Liberal Arts summer stipend helped me continue the work. I also benefited enormously from the supportive intellectual community of the USC Film Studies Program. Susan Courtney took a deep interest in my manuscript and was a vital booster. I am grateful for years of inspiration from Laura Kissel, as well as our fellow orphanista Julie Hubbert. Other great Carolina colleagues and friends deserve thanks, including Karl Heider, Ina Hark, Steve Marsh, Craig Kridel, Greg Forter, Nicholas Vazsonyi, Agnes Mueller, Rebecca Stern, Davis Baird, Deanna Leamon, and Brad Collins. The title “student assistant” fails to convey the dedication and talent with which Michael Conklin, Elizabeth Miller, Matt Sefick, and factotum David Burch rewarded me.

-xvii-

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