The Memoirs of Alton Augustus Adams, Sr: First Black Bandmaster of the United States Navy

By Alton Augustus Adams Sr.; Mark Clague | Go to book overview

5
The United States Navy Band
of the Virgin Islands (1917–1923)

Editor’s Note: Adams offers a firsthand account of the desperate economic and social situation on the Virgin Islands prior to their transfer from Denmark to the United States, setting the stage for his argument about the navy’s positive contributions. Following the disruption of shipping caused by World War I and 1916’s devastating category 2 hurricane, the islands’ economy was in a shambles. Labor strikes on St. Croix and St. Thomas fanned class tensions as well. So the United States and its naval administrators inherited a territory with few prospects and many problems, including an underdeveloped infrastructure (roads, sanitation), poor health care, and a failing and underfunded educational system. Adams details his friendship with D. Hamilton Jackson, a pioneering union leader in St. Croix who published the islands’ first pro-labor newspaper, in which Adams began his journalistic career. The story of the United States Navy Band of the Virgin Islands follows—its inception, expanding activities, and social initiatives. This band served as a bridge between the navy and native Virgin Islanders, between white and black. The band’s public concerts, educational outreach, unique local newspaper, and tours contributed to the development of both the islands’ community identity and their tourist industry. Adams’s own success underscores the values of education and ambition set forth in earlier chapters. He is an exemplar of a self-made man who took full advantage of shifting circumstance to realize what many thought impossible—a vibrant musical career in a location once considered lacking in opportunity. By working with the navy, Adams reached new heights of artistic performance and creativity. He helped found the public library, started the islands’ music education program, and traveled to the States, meeting remarkable leaders in a number of fields.

-86-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Memoirs of Alton Augustus Adams, Sr: First Black Bandmaster of the United States Navy
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 368

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.