The Early Life of John Howard Payne: With Contemporary Letters Heretofore Unpublished

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EARLY LIFE OF JOHN HOWARD
PAYNE

JOHN HOWARD PAYNE, the sixth of a family of nine children, was born in the city of New York, at No. 33 Pearl Street, on the ninth of June, 1791.1 He was the son of William Payne, by his second wife, Sarah Isaacs, whose father--a convert from the Jewish faith, a man of good education, much respected, and of some means--had settled at East Hampton, Long Island, many years previous to the Revolution. On his father's side especially, John Howard Payne was well connected. His paternal ancestors were of English blood. Judge Robert Treat Paine, of Boston, one of the signers of the Declaration of Independence, and Robert Treat Paine, Jr., a poet of no mean ability, were of the same family, as was Dolly Payne, wife of President Madison.

Soon after his marriage to Sarah Isaacs, in

____________________
1
There have been many mis-statements as to the year of Payne's birth. Many articles regarding him, and most encyclopedias, give the year as 1792. Mr. Harrison writes at some length to give proof that the year should be 1791, and this year is now generally accepted as the correct one.

-15-

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The Early Life of John Howard Payne: With Contemporary Letters Heretofore Unpublished
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page 3
  • PREFATORY NOTE 5
  • Introduction 11
  • EARLY LIFE OF JOHN HOWARD PAYNE 15
  • Bibliography 163
  • No. I. The Thespian Mirror 165
  • ADDENDA 173
  • The Thespian Mirror. 189
  • No. Xiv. The Thespian Mirror 193
  • Home, Sweet Home 205
  • Home, Sweet Home 207
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