The Secret Life of Things: Animals, Objects, and It-Narratives in Eighteenth-Century England

By Mark Blackwell | Go to book overview

Contributors

LIZ BELLAMY is a Research Associate at The Open University. Her publications include Commerce, Morality and the Eighteenth-Century Novel (1998), Samuel Johnson (2004), and an edition of Daniel Defoe’s Conjugal Lewdness(2005) in the Pickering Masters series.

BARBARA M. BENEDICT is the Charles A. Dana Professor of English Literature at Trinity College in Connecticut. She is the author of Framing Feeling: Sentiment and Style in English Prose Fiction, 1745–1800(1994), Making the Modern Reader: Cultural Mediation in Restoration and EighteenthCentury Literary Anthologies(1996), and Curiosity: A Cultural History of Early Modern Inquiry (2001), and the editor of Wilkes and the Late Eighteenth Century(2002) and Jane Austen’s Northanger Abbey (2006). She has also published essays on eighteenth-century poetry, fiction, popular culture, and book history.

BONNIE BLACKWELL is Associate Professor of English and Director of Graduate Studies at Texas Christian University. Her research interests include film, feminism, the novel, and the eighteenth century, and her articles have appeared in such journals as Genders, Camera Obscura, and ELH. She is completing her book manuscript, Immodest Proposals, on marriage and satire in Britain and Ireland during the long eighteenth century.

MARK BLACKWELL is Associate Professor of English at the University of Hartford. He has recently published essays on Locke’s theory of personal identity, on sublimity and the politics of taste in Burke’s Enquiry, on narrative motion in Radcliffe’s Gothic fiction, on allusion in Austen’s Sense and Sensibility, and on social transplantation in Emma. His essay on live-tooth transplantation won the 2004–5 James L. Clifford Prize.

AILEEN DOUGLAS is a member of the School of English, Trinity College Dublin. She is the author of Uneasy Sensations: Smollett and the Body (1995) and the co-editor of Locating Swift (Four Courts Press, 1998). She is completing a manuscript, Bodies of Writing: Script and the Individual,

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