History Matters: Patriarchy and the Challenge of Feminism

By Judith M. Bennett | Go to book overview

Notes

Chapter 1

1. Feminist history is most firmly entrenched in the United States and the Netherlands, but it is recognized elsewhere, too. For an overview of the national and institutional contexts of the development of the field as of 1990, see Writing Women’s History: International Perspectives, ed. Karen Offen, Ruth Roach Pierson, and Jane Rendall (Basingstoke: Macmillan, 1991), esp. xxiixxvii.

2. As cited in Anne Clark Bartlett, “Defining the Terms: Postfeminism as an Ideology of Cool,” Medieval Feminist Forum 34 (Fall 2002): 25-29, at 28.

3. In 1970s Toronto, I learned not only about feminism and history but also about constructive criticism that facilitates change and growth. I hope that History Matters: Patriarchy and the Challenge of Feminism falls within that positive tradition, and if so, much credit is due to the constructive critiques of colleagues and friends. I will not repeat here my gratitude to those whose comments enriched the original articles that inform some parts of what follows, but I would like to acknowledge my debt to Sandy Bardsley, Laura Gowing, Cynthia Herrup, Nancy Hewitt, Ruth Karras, Patricia Skinner, and Martha Vicinus, who critically read this new book-length formulation; the final book is much better for their generous advice, although they do not, of course, bear any responsibility for the arguments herein. I also thank the research assistants who have made my work so much easier: Dana Brinson, Bethany Keenan, Kristina Lorusso, Jennifer Walcoff, and Janelle Werner.

4. For permission to draw on my past writings, I thank Indiana University Press, for “Confronting Continuity,” Journal of Women’s History 9:3 (1997): 73-94; the American Historical Association for Medieval Women in Modern Perspective (Washington, D.C.: AHA, 2000); and the University of Texas Press, for “ ‘Lesbian-Like’ and the Social History of Lesbianisms,” Journal of the History of Sexuality 9:1/2 (2000): 1-24. My other relevant essays are “Women’s History: A Study in Change and Continuity,” Women’s History Review 2 (1993): 173-84; “Medievalism and Feminism,” Speculum: A Journal of Medieval Studies 68 (1993): 309-31; “Medieval Women, Modern Women: Across the Great Divide,” in Culture and History, 1350-1600: Essays on English Communities, Identities, and Writing, ed. David Aers (London: Harvester Wheatsheaf, 1992), 147-75, with a revised version in Feminists Revision History, ed. Ann-Louise Shapiro (New Brunswick, N.J.: Rutgers University Press, 1994), 47-72; “Feminism and History,” Gender and History 1 (1989): 251-72.

5. I borrow this phrase from Carolyn Dinshaw, Getting Medieval: Sexualities and Communities, Pre- and Postmodern (Durham, N.C.: Duke University Press, 1999), who herself took it from a comment in the 1994 movie Pulp Fiction.

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