Dorothy Day and the Catholic Worker: The Miracle of Our Continuance

By Dorothy Day; Kate Hennessy | Go to book overview

five: PROTEST AND PRISON

Protesting and going to jail were not easy for Dorothy, but she believed that civil disobedience for unjust laws was necessary, and it was real suffering and a real act to go to jail for one’s beliefs. Each time she was arrested and imprisoned, she was reminded of how much need there is for those in prison, and how, hidden behind its walls, prisoners are forgotten. Dorothy didn’t advise that everyone go to jail, as she knew how physically and emotionally dangerous it could be for young men and women, and she didn’t always agree with some of the actions for which people were imprisoned. But Dorothy believed in following one’s conscience, and she deeply respected anyone who was willing to go to jail in the following of that conscience.

Dorothy herself was arrested eight times, beginning in 1917 in Washington, D.C., where at the age of twenty she was arrested with a group of suffragists. She joined a hunger strike in prison meant to call attention to the brutal treatment the women were receiving, and she served eighteen days of a thirty-day sentence before being pardoned by President Woodrow Wilson. In 1922, Dorothy was arrested in Chicago while helping a woman recover from a suicide attempt. They were staying in a boarding house filled with members of the Industrial Workers of the World (the IWW). The IWW was a radical labor union, and the two women found themselves caught up in an anti-radical raid, but after a weekend in jail, the trumped-up charges

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Dorothy Day and the Catholic Worker: The Miracle of Our Continuance
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Preface ix
  • Introduction 1
  • One- House of Hospitality 16
  • Two- The Paper 43
  • Three- The Farm 60
  • Four- The Duty of Delight 84
  • Five- Protest and Prison 107
  • Six- Prayer 116
  • Epilogue- What Can One Person Do? 128
  • Excerpt Sources 130
  • Index of Photos 133
  • Select Titles from Empire State Editions 137
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