Six CHARITY AND HATE

"IF to be the head of Hell is as hard as what I have to undergo here, I could find it in my heart to pity Satan himself"--so, with that latent sadness in his eyes, the harrowed Lincoln once told General Schenck. At another time, in sprightlier mood, and doubtless with a wry smile, he protested:

"I wish George Washington or some of those old patriots were here in my place so that I could have a little rest."

Leonard Volk had made a life mask of him at Chicago in April of 1860; and in the spring of 1865, at Washington, Clark Mills (who did Andrew Jackson on his prancing charger in Lafayette Square) made another. In these contrasting masks, more effectively than in photographs, may be read the toll that the war years had laid upon him. The second, as Hay points out, has the deeply cut lines "set, as if the living face, like the copy, had been in bronze; . . . the mouth is fixed like that of an archaic statue; a look as of one on whom sorrow and care had done their worst without victory is on all the features." . . .

It is the Lincoln whom Crook, on duty in the passageway, heard groaning in his sleep--the Lincoln who said to Owen Lovejoy ("the best friend I had in Congress"): "This war is eating my life out; I have a strong impression that I shall not live to see the end." In July 1864, when a visitor, noticing how worn he seemed, had remarked, "You are wearing yourself out with work," he objected: "I can't work less; but it isn't that--work never troubled me."

There had been the exposé in Baltimore, the night trip through the city--the reluctant conviction that men sought his life. He had

-127-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Great American Myth
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Illustrations vii
  • Foreword ix
  • One Federal City, 1860-1865 3
  • Two · a President-Elect Takes a Journey 13
  • Three - The Safeguarding of Lincoln 51
  • Four The True John Booth 75
  • Five "A Turn Towards the Evil" 97
  • Six Charity and Hate 127
  • Seven the Fourteenth of April 145
  • Eight Pandemonium 168
  • Nine . . . . . Terror by Night 186
  • Ten . . . . . . Flight's End 228
  • Eleven . . . . . This Was He 259
  • Twelve False Colors and Shapes 324
  • Afterword 382
  • Pardon 393
  • Acknowledgments 394
  • Bibliography 396
  • Index 408
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 438

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.