Dramatic Difference: Gender, Class, and Genre in the Early Modern Closet Drama

By Karen Raber | Go to book overview

Acknowledgments

THIS BOOK IS, IN A SENSE, A COLLABORATIVE EFFORT. IT REFLECTS the fruits of decades of labor on the part of a community of feminist scholars and critics who have diligently uncovered early modern women’s texts and histories; but it was also shaped over time by the reactions and contributions of many colleagues in the field of early modern literary studies. Although I single out many individuals below, I want to thank those whose names appear elsewhere in this book—in the footnotes and bibliography—and some whose names might not appear at all, who unselfishly offered informal advice and information. I feel privileged to participate in a dynamic conversation about early modern women’s lives and work, a conversation taking place in journals and books, in libraries and archives, at conferences and symposia. For those of us who recall when there was little or nothing in print about the field of early women’s writing, this conversation represents an extraordinary and sustaining seachange in the profession.

My single greatest debt is to Louis Montrose at the University of California, San Diego, under whose guidance I first began to work on the material for this project. His encouragement was essential to my continued study in the field. His influence has been of incalculable extent and value—not only have I been inspired by his work on gender, drama, and early modern literature and culture, as have so many others, but I owe my growth as a scholar to his professionalism, warmth, and generosity of spirit.

Over the years, during innumberable revisions and additions, other communities of readers have helped shape the book, and I am eternally grateful for their insights. Members of the Graduate Group for the Study of Early Modern Culture at the University of California, San Diego—including Ben Bertram, Susan Light, Liza Nelligan, and David Kuchta—gave unstintingly of their friendship and attention throughout the early years of the project’s development. Karen Hollis read many early portions of

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