Becoming a Subject: Political Prisoners in the Greek Civil War

By Polymeris Voglis | Go to book overview

Chapter 2
Legacies

The First Signs of Political Exclusion

The first attempts at systematic political repression and prosecution in Greece occurred during the period of the “National Schism,” a conflict arising from a disagreement between the government of the Liberal Party of Eleftherios Venizelos, who supported the participation of Greece in the First World War on the side of the Entente, and King Constantine, who opted for the neutrality of Greece. This disagreement generated a conflict between republicans and royalists that went beyond the issue of Greece’s participation in the Great War to dominate the political life of the country in the interwar era, deeply dividing Greek society into two adversarial camps with different political cultures, aspirations, and economic and societal projects.

In the context of the civil strife generated in 1915 and 1916 by the “National Schism”, the 1917 Liberal government purged state mechanisms (the army, the gendarmerie, and the judicature in particular) of royalists and employed an old law against brigandage to prosecute royalists and other opponents of the Liberals’ foreign policy.1 The 1871 law on the suppression of banditry, an endemic problem in Greece during the nineteenth century, gave administrative or military authorities the power to banish the relatives of bandits.2 In 1913 a further law stipulating the penalty of banishment for individuals suspected of the disturbance of public security enabled the banishment of the first socialists and trade unionists.3 The law for the suppression of banditry, together with its completions and amendments and the penalty of banishment, would be used extensively not only throughout the interwar era but after the Second World War as well. It provided for establishing in every prefecture (nomos) a Public Security Committee, consisting of the prefect, the chief of the gendarmerie and the public prosecutor. The committee could banish anyone suspected of breaching “the public order, peace and security of the country” for one year. The laws for “administrative banish-

Notes for this section begin on page 48.

-33-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Becoming a Subject: Political Prisoners in the Greek Civil War
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 252

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.