ACKNOWLEDGMENTS

At the head of the list I must place Patricia and Scott Wendt of Bluestem Books in Lincoln, Nebraska. Both have probably heard more about Kit Carson than they ever wanted to know. Scott has proved his touch at locating Western materials and information that I despaired of finding. It was Pat who kept telling me that I should write more and keep on the job once started, and her reward was to find herself involved in the production of the “hard copy” of “Dunlay’s Damned Book.” I also owe them both, and William Wood, for helping pick things up after a minor disaster at my place.

Professor Fred Luebke of the University of Nebraska–Lincoln was no longer my official adviser when he put me on the trail of indispensable information regarding the Kit Carson controversy of recent years; he did it anyway. Following that trail brought me into contact with R. C. Gordon-McCutcheon and Skip Miller of the Kit Carson Historic Museums in Taos, New Mexico. I was able to use the museum archives and to read the articles for Kit Carson: Indian Fighter or Indian Killer? well before publication. Frank Torres at Fort Union National Monument helped me obtain a photograph of one of the paintings at the museum.

Marc Simmons, who is at work on a Kit Carson biography of his own, was very generous in providing information and exchanging ideas. I wish I could feel I had repaid him. Jennifer Bosley at the Colorado Historical Society located the microfilm of Carson’s Fort Garland correspondence and ensured that I got copies.

Characteristically, I have either forgotten or failed to obtain the names of a number of people who helped me. These include the security chief at Fort Lyon Veterans Hospital (who knew more about Kit Carson than anyone else there), Maureen at Canyon de Chelly, and the New Mexico state archivist who pointed me toward other special material.

The staff of the interlibrary loan service at Love Library, University of Nebraska–Lincoln, deserve special thanks, particularly Lisa Parr.

-xix-

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Kit Carson and the Indians
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Illustrations ix
  • Preface xi
  • Acknowledgments xix
  • 1- Will the Real Kit Carson Please Stand Up? 1
  • 2- Backcountry 24
  • 3- Mountain Man 37
  • 4- Guideandscout 85
  • 5- Indian Agent 148
  • 6- Soldier 228
  • 7- Peacemaker 343
  • 8- Conclusion 418
  • Notes 461
  • Index 509
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