1.Will the Real
Kit Carson Please
Stand Up?

Carson: Gentlemen, that thar may be true,
but I hain’t got no recollection of it.
Henry Inman, The Old Santa Fe Trail

In the fall of 1851 a young American writer who had gained some fame for his books based on his experiences as a sailor and his travels in the South Seas published a novel about whales and whaling, among other things. The writer, of course, was Herman Melville and the novel was Moby-Dick. To prove that whaling was a sufficiently elevated subject for literature, he wrote a chapter called “The Honor and Glory of Whaling,” in which he more than half humorously dragged in the name of every mythological figure who could conceivably have anything to do with his topic, including “Perseus, St. George, Hercules, Jonah, and Vishnoo!” Hercules he characterized as “that antique Crockett and Kit Carson.” Melville clearly assumed that his American readers, at least, would recognize the names of the American heroes he ranked with Hercules and would consider the comparison, if fanciful, not wholly inappropriate.

But who were these Americans deemed worthy to stand with the Greek hero, “that brawny doer of rejoicing good deeds”? In 1851 Davy Crockett was fifteen years dead in the Alamo, the manner of his passing having turned a folksy, tall-tale-telling Indian fighter and congressman into one of the great dead. A series of Davy Crockett almanacs telling ever-taller tales of his imaginary exploits was keeping his memory green.1

But Christopher “Kit” Carson was very much alive in 1851 and living in Rayado, New Mexico. He was in his early forties, barely ten years

-1-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Kit Carson and the Indians
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Illustrations ix
  • Preface xi
  • Acknowledgments xix
  • 1- Will the Real Kit Carson Please Stand Up? 1
  • 2- Backcountry 24
  • 3- Mountain Man 37
  • 4- Guideandscout 85
  • 5- Indian Agent 148
  • 6- Soldier 228
  • 7- Peacemaker 343
  • 8- Conclusion 418
  • Notes 461
  • Index 509
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 537

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.