Journal, 1955-1962: Reflections on the French-Algerian War

By Mouloud Feraoun; James D. Le Sueur et al. | Go to book overview

1959

February 29, 1959

Back home. Kaci has been eliminated in his turn. It seems he was embezzling funds. It has been four years since he joined the maquis. Both of his brothers have stayed. But that did not save him. It is true that he was not worth much. Neither were his brothers. Apparently, those who regard the lives of others so cheaply are, sooner or later, repaid in kind. Tragic times and tragic Kabylia. Tragic because every day traitors are discovered, then put to death; and those who kill them also end up dead. People are talking a lot about the network of undercover agents that almost rallied all of Kabylia last June. It is absolutely certain that the maquis were infiltrated, and this explains their lack of success and the drastic cuts that the army was able to inflict each time; in every instance, the sword came down to eviscerate the organization.

When there were not any men left to help the rebels, they called on the women to take the men’s place and forced them to take on all tasks and responsibilities. The army infiltrated these women’s organizations, and that is why prisons and camps are now filling up with women. The fellagha slit the throats of women who betray them; the army shoots, arrests, or tortures women who work for the organization. Both sides rape the prettiest ones and make bastards with young girls as well as widows. Thank God for sparing the married women from such encounters. On these grounds people generally credit the fellagha with showing respect for customs or just plain human dignity, whereas the army is always ready to trample on it… A thousand times more respectful, a member of the fellagha is discreet and never forces anyone. He hides from both the townspeople and his comrades in arms. When a scandal breaks out, he is severely punished. Or he switches sides and starts attacking his brothers in arms of the previous night.

-261-

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Journal, 1955-1962: Reflections on the French-Algerian War
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Editor’s Acknowledgments vi
  • Translators’ Preface vii
  • Introduction ix
  • Preface to the Original French Edition xlix
  • 1955 11
  • 1956 51
  • 1957 165
  • 1958 235
  • 1959 261
  • 1960 271
  • 1961 287
  • 1962 309
  • Notes 317
  • Glossary 335
  • Index 337
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