Journal, 1955-1962: Reflections on the French-Algerian War

By Mouloud Feraoun; James D. Le Sueur et al. | Go to book overview

1960

January 25, 1960

Yesterday, the reactionaries organized a demonstration to protest Massu’s resignation. At about 6:00 P.M., a volley of gunfire erupted in rue Michelet-Grande Poste. A state of siege was declared in the city, and the curfew was moved up to 8:00 P.M. All night long the radio broadcast Delouvrier’s call to order, the chief general’s communiqué, and at 6:00 this morning another by General de Gaulle.

Outcome: 19 dead, 141 wounded (8 casualties for the army).

Lagaillarde-Martel stood his ground against the universities and their troublemakers. Ortiz-Lopinto, did the same at the Bank of Algeria.

The Ultras are armed and do not intend to turn themselves in. Stores and schools are closed. The Muslims have not budged. They are waiting to find out with what sauce they will be devoured. May 13, January 24, the days go by, and “everything seems out of joint.”

I am assuming that it was the reactionaries who sent me the threatening letter a little over a month ago.1 They politely warned me to get my “death shroud” ready and to quickly finish the rebellion’s apologia that I had intended to write.

I have to confess that I neither wrote the apologia nor prepared any shroud. God is good! This is what the Muslims say about my species. I am afraid, of course. Pélieu, being aware of these threats, came to offer me a refuge. My wife would have liked to embrace him.

They are preparing a demonstration this evening that could still go wrong, since the state of siege obviously implies that the formation of groups of more than three people is forbidden. Is the army reliable? We shall see.

The day before yesterday, fearing what was going to hap-

-271-

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Journal, 1955-1962: Reflections on the French-Algerian War
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Editor’s Acknowledgments vi
  • Translators’ Preface vii
  • Introduction ix
  • Preface to the Original French Edition xlix
  • 1955 11
  • 1956 51
  • 1957 165
  • 1958 235
  • 1959 261
  • 1960 271
  • 1961 287
  • 1962 309
  • Notes 317
  • Glossary 335
  • Index 337
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