Exploring Subregional Conflict: Opportunities for Conflict Prevention

By Chandra Lekha Sriram; Zoe Nielsen | Go to book overview

Introduction: Why Examine
Subregional Sources and
Dynamics of Conflict?

CHANDRA LEKHA SRIRAM & ZOE NIELSEN

IT IS WELL KNOWN THAT THERE ARE MYRIAD CAUSES OF CONFLICT AND THAT preventing violent conflict requires addressing root and proximate causes.1 In addition, it is understood that different causes and types of conflict plague different countries and different regions. Similarly, the level of conflict also varies across regions, subregions, countries, and even districts. While research in recent years has generated findings on the range of possible causes of conflict generally, and case studies have applied many of these insights to particular countries, less work has been done on the ways in which the relative significance of different causes may vary in particular subregions of the world.2 More elaboration on regional variances is clearly needed.3

Developing a greater understanding of these regional variances is significant for the elaboration of preventive policy responses in two senses. First, regional variances in the causes and nature of conflict can suggest a relative prioritization of tools and resources at the policymaking stage. Second, at the implementation stage, they can aid a greater understanding of the comparative advantages among the multiple preventive actors that are likely to be on the ground and thereby inform better strategic coordination.

By examining the causes of conflict in the Horn of Africa, Central Asia, West Africa, and Central America—four subregions that exhibit similarities and differences in terms of both the causes and the levels of conflict—we aim to contribute to a growing body of work that may lead to better preventive strategies in the future.

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Exploring Subregional Conflict: Opportunities for Conflict Prevention
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Foreword vii
  • Acknowledgments xi
  • Introduction- Why Examine Subregional Sources and Dynamics of Conflict? 1
  • 1 - Understanding Conflicts in the Horn of Africa 17
  • 2 - Stability and Change in Central Asia 55
  • 3 - Sources of Conflict in West Africa 93
  • 4 - Dynamics of Conflict in Central America 131
  • 5 - Implications for Conflict Prevention 169
  • Acronyms 189
  • Selected Bibliography 193
  • The Contributors 201
  • Index 203
  • About the Book 209
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