Ethnicity and the Making of History in Northern Ghana

By Carola Lentz | Go to book overview

5
LABOUR MIGRATION, HOME-TIES
AND ETHNICITY

Civilization advances apace, if the standard of progress can be judged
by the number of natives who now wear clothes and carry walking
sticks or spears, in preference to the old order of perhaps nothing or at
best a sheep or goat skin hung over the back, the bow in the hand and
the quiver under the arm. The people of bow and arrow used to meet
the Commissioner on his arrival perhaps two miles from the rest
house, and would … leap out with twanging bows and bloodcurling
yells … Now they are a much more sedate crowd, 75 per cent at least
being clothed, many of them in European clothes, all wearing some
kind of headgear, who meet the Commissioner a few hundred yards
from the rest house.1

For the British, ‘nakedness’ was an indicator of native primitiveness; and if, as was almost always the case, men carried bows and arrows, it was a sign of dangerous aggressiveness. By as early as the 1920s this nakedness was largely covered up and the aggressiveness disciplined, a development that the Lawra District Commissioner Eyre-Smith, the author of the above remarks, attributed to the impact of labour migration. Through work in the mines, in railway construction and on cocoa plantations, an increasing number of young men were not only earning the money required to buy clothing, but also adopting new ideas of what was considered beautiful and what constituted desirable consumer goods. They were becoming familiar with the world that extended beyond their village and experiencing a certain degree of autonomy from their fathers and ancestors. In short, they were ‘civilising’ themselves, and, by sharing their experiences and views, they were also civilising their brothers back home. As Eyre-Smith reflected, ‘[t]hese boys return with a wider outlook and new ideas; they have discovered that they can live for twelve months without frequently consulting the family fetish; all these facts are imparted … to their less civilized brothers.’2

Labour migration linked virtually every compound in Lawra District with the wider world of the Gold Coast and the Ashanti Protectorate, ensuring the tangible economic integration of Lawra District into the colony and into the empire. At the same time, it brought with it a sort of

-138-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Ethnicity and the Making of History in Northern Ghana
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • List of Maps and Plates vi
  • Preface vii
  • Introduction 1
  • 1 - The North-West in the Nineteenth Century 14
  • 2 - The Introduction of Chieftaincy 33
  • 3 - The Discursive Creation of Ethnicity 72
  • 4 - The Lawra Confederacy Native Authority 104
  • 5 - Labour Migration, Home-Ties and Ethnicity 138
  • 6 - ‘Light over the Volta’- The Mission of the White Fathers 153
  • 7 - Decolonisation and Local Government Reform 175
  • 8 - ‘The Time When Politics Came’- Party Politics and Local Conflict 199
  • 9 - Ethnic Movements and Special-Interest Politics 228
  • 10 - The Cultural Work of Ethnicity 252
  • Epilogue 275
  • Notes 280
  • Abbreviations 322
  • Glossary 323
  • Divisional (Paramount) Chiefs of Lawra District 324
  • References 325
  • Index 337
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 346

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.