The Encyclopedia of Christianity - Vol. 5

By Erwin Fahlbusch; Jan Milič Lochman et al. | Go to book overview

U

Ubiquity

1. In the context of Christian theology, ubiquity, or the teaching that God is everywhere (Lat. ubique), is related to the distinction between God and the world (i.e., God’s transcendence). The omnipresence of God shows clearly that the divine transcendence (→ Immanence and Transcendence) does not mean that the Creator is alongside the creature but involves the direct permeation of every creature by the Creator, who has given it its being and maintains it in being (conservatio; → Creation). → Pantheism, which stresses the unity of God with the world, does at least resist the idea of God at a spatial distance from the world.

→ Scholasticism spoke of the divine presence through his effects, through his present action, and through the giving of existence. It regarded God’s ubiquity as his “repletive” presence. God fills the world so that we cannot anywhere exclude him. He is wholly present in every part of each specific space (circumscriptive or definitive), but in such a way that he still permeates and fills all creation (repletive). His presence thus excludes “local motion” (motus localis; see P. Lombard Sent. 1.37.164–72; Aquinas Summa theol. I, q. 8; G. Biel, Collectorium ca. Quattuor libros 1.37.2.4, where there is a definition of modes of presence).

2. Ubiquity is a predicate of God alone. In the debates between M. → Luther (1483–1546; → Luther’s Theology) and U. → Zwingli (1484–1531; → Zwingli’s Theology) about the possibility of the real presence of Christ’s body and blood at the → Eucharist (§3.3), which was later renewed by Reformed and Lutheran dogmaticians, the question concerned the ubiquity of the human nature of Christ. The Reformed agreed with Zwingli that the distinction of Christ’s divine and human natures remains, in spite of the unity of person. They claimed that both Scripture and the creeds stated that between the ascension and the return, the humanity of Christ is at the right hand of the Father. They could argue, as did J. Hooper (ca. 1495–1555) and M. V. Coverdale (1488?-1569), that omnipresence is incompatible with true humanity. They rejected a eucharistic presence of Christ’s body and blood that was a presence only of substance without accidents. They believed, however, that by the incomprehensible working of the Holy Spirit, believers can spiritually feed on Christ’s body and blood, so that, as J. → Calvin (1509–64; → Calvin’s Theology) paradoxically put it, “the whole Christ is present, but not in his wholeness” (Inst. 4.17.30).

With Luther, the champions of Lutheran → orthodoxy (§1) argued for a real and not merely a verbal communication of attributes (→ Christology 2.4.4), so that with the unity of person there is a unity

-579-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Encyclopedia of Christianity - Vol. 5
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • List of Entries vii
  • Introduction x
  • Consulting Editors xiv
  • Abbreviations xxi
  • Si 1
  • T 299
  • U 579
  • V 659
  • W 701
  • X 819
  • Y 823
  • Z 841
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 866

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.