Does Human Rights Need God?

By Elizabeth M. Bucar; Barbra Barnett | Go to book overview

Series Foreword

This series explores dilemmas and debates at the intersections of religion, ethics, and public life. At a time when religion pervades the public square, concerned citizens puzzle over the connections between their religious beliefs and the moral practices of civic life. The Eerdmans Religion, Ethics, and Public Life Series delivers high caliber books that reflect on the religious and moral dimensions of politics, culture, and society. The series foregrounds the relationship among theological and philosophical scholarship, practical ethics, and policy studies — all contextualized in light of contemporary themes and issues. It does so by integrating a broad array of perspectives from diverse religious faiths, moral traditions, academic disciplines, political persuasions, and professional vocations. Some of the books in the series bring scholars, public leaders and officials, and policy experts together within one volume to discuss the religious and moral meanings of timely issues and to provide a venue in which their work can be mutually informative. In addition to multiauthored volumes, the series also features monographs which make compelling arguments that enrich ongoing conversations or initiate new ones. Books in the series are intended for a wide readership, including academics, clergy, government officials, journalists, students, policy experts, leaders of public institutions, and interested citizens generally.

As the second installment in the series, this book expands our conceptual and practical inquiry into universal human rights — an enduring legacy of twentieth-century political life, yet a still imperiled aspiration for many people in the twenty-first. In recent years, the language of human rights has made tremendous institutional inroads, jostling its way into the lexicon of international politics. As news of intolerable atrocities splashes too frequently across our front pages and television screens, as prominent international rights organizations fill greater space and apply increasing pressure in world

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