Does Human Rights Need God?

By Elizabeth M. Bucar; Barbra Barnett | Go to book overview

Contributors

Khaled Abou El Fadl is a Full Professor of Law at the UCLA School of Law, where he teaches Islamic law, immigration, human rights, international, and national security law. Raised in Egypt and Kuwait, he trained in Islamic legal sciences in Egypt, Kuwait, and the United States. He is a member of the Board of Human Rights Watch, a recent presidential appointee to the United States Commission on International Religious Freedom, and a 2005 Carnegie Foundation Scholar. Dr. Abou El Fadl’s most recent books include Islam and the Challenge of Democracy, And God Knows the Soldiers: The Authoritative and Authoritarian in Islamic Discourses, and The Great Theft: Wrestling Islam from the Extremists.

Barbra Barnett is pursuing her doctoral degree in ethics at the University of Chicago Divinity School and is a former research associate with the Pew Forum on Religion and Public Life. She received her J.D., with honors, from the George Washington University Law School in 1996. Her research interests and writing focus on political virtue and responsibility in religiously pluralistic communities and the role of legal and political institutions in mediating and resolving conflicting claims.

Elizabeth M. Bucar is a doctoral candidate in ethics at the University of Chicago Divinity School. Her research and writing focuses on gender, rhetoric, and comparative religion (Roman Catholicism and Shi‘ite Islam). She has served as a research associate with the Pew Forum on Religion and Public Life and as policy analyst for Catholics for a Free Choice.

Jean Bethke Elshtain is Laura Spelman Rockefeller Professor of Social and Political Ethics at the University of Chicago Divinity School. Through her work as a political philosopher she has tried to show the connections between

-x-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Does Human Rights Need God?
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 391

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.