America's Agatha Christie: Mignon Good Eberhart, Her Life and Works

By Rick Cypert | Go to book overview

4
From Chicago to Connecticut with Hollywood
and Broadway in Between: 1937–1941

“Money is a danger,” he had said wearily. “You think when
you’re earning it that it’s a way to make yourself safe from—oh,
anything.”

Danger Money

IN DECEMBER 1936, ALAN EBERHART COMPLETED HIS CONTRACT AND project with the Underground Construction Company of Chicago. He and Mignon had lived in Chicago since the summer of 1930. A “News of the Stage” note in a March issue of the New York Times observed that “Martin Jones just now is arranging for a dramatization of Mignon G. Eberhart’s murder mystery story, ‘The House on the Roof.”’1 With Mignon Eberhart’s star rising, she and Alan spent January 1937 on holiday in Florida. According to an article in the Miami Herald, Mignon and Alan were residing in the penthouse at the Hotel Good, where Alan was “recuperating from a recent illness.”2 Another article commented that Eberhart’s “Pattern” was currently being published serially, and that Danger in the Dark was a best seller.3 Eberhart continued to write novels, popular with book reviewers. Will Cuppy advised readers to “hock something, if necessary” in order to buy a copy of Fair Warning.4 Praising The Pattern, Isaac Anderson commented on “the manner in which Mrs. Eberhart has made the characters come alive and…. the dreadful suspense that hangs over the two who expect at any moment to be arrested.”5 In 1938, the Boston Transcript would observe of Hasty Wedding that “[f]ew writers of mystery stories of today are able to combine the elements of love and of mystery in one story with neither losing from the combination, as Mrs. Eberhart can.”6

By March 1937, Alan had recuperated, and the Eberharts had relocated to Connecticut and had purchased a colonial style house on three acres in Stamford.7 Faith Baldwin learned the news while on vacation in Florida with Gonnie (Mlle. X) and visiting the Eberharts

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