Seyder Tkhines: The Forgotten Book of Common Prayer for Jewish Women

By Devra Kay | Go to book overview

Glossary

Amide. (Standing prayer). Central prayer of the three daily synagogue services. It is also known as the Shmoyne esrey, which means “eighteen,” denoting the eighteen blessings of which the original consisted; or simply Tfile meaning “prayer.”

Ashkenazim. (Adj. Ashkenazic) The Jews (and their descendants) who began to settle in the German-speaking lands in the basins of the Rhine and Danube rivers about a thousand years ago. The term was applied retrospectively.

Av Harakhamim. Prayer usually said in Ashkenazic synagogue services on Sabbath mornings in memory of the martyrs of the Crusades. It was composed during the first Crusade and left on the reader’s desk in the synagogue at Worms by its unknown author.

Bovo-bukh. Yiddish literary epic first printed in Isny in 1541. Composed by Elijah Levitah in ottava rima. The term bobe-mayse, which today is widely believed to mean “old wives tale” (lit. grandmother’s story) stemming from the Slavic word bobe (grandmother), in fact stems from the title of this tale of adventure and romance.

Colophon. Words usually found at the end of the last printed page in a book. Early printed colophons included the date when printing began and/or ended, the number of copies printed, and the name of the ruler under whose protection the book was issued. The word “colophon” is derived from the Ionian city of Colophon. It was believed that the Colophonians could tip the scale of favor for whichever side of battle they fought, enabling the battle to end; hence the phrase of Erasmus, Colophonem adidi, “I have put the finishing touch to it,” and its use to describe the words at the end of a book.

Firzogerin. Female prayer leader in a gathering of female worshippers.

Galkhes. Term used by Jews to describe Christian books or books in Latin characters rather than Hebrew characters, i.e., galkhes sforim (Christian books). Denotes “Christian priestly” and derives from the word galekh (a derogatory Jewish term for a Christian priest), which itself stems from the root of the Hebrew verb “to shave” and indicates the tonsure on the head of a monk or priest.

Gemore. The talmudic commentary on the Mishnah.

Hadlokes ha-ner. Kindling of candles on Sabbath and Festivals. One of the three women’s commandments.

-247-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Seyder Tkhines: The Forgotten Book of Common Prayer for Jewish Women
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 269

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.