Ishi in Three Centuries

By Karl Kroeber; Clifton Kroeber | Go to book overview

Suggested Readings

The following bibliography is intended to assist nonspecialists to pursue matters related to Ishi raised by contributions to this volume. The writers most often cited in the foregoing pages are, of course, Alfred and Theodora Kroeber. In addition to those already cited, there are many other items from Alfred Kroeber’s immense bibliography relevant to his experiences with Ishi. Among some of the often overlooked of these is “The Anthropology of California” (1908), revealing Kroeber’s early view of his professional functions, which in some essentials changed little over the years. But later studies reveal a steady development and refinement of his understanding of ethnographic possibilities and problems. His views seem to have been significantly influenced by his threedecade association with a remarkable Yurok man, Robert Spott, who collaborated with him in some important publications, such as “Yurok Narratives” (1942). “Indians of California” (1914) focuses on postcontact relations between California Indians and Europeans. A 532-item bibliography (Gibson and Rowe 1961) was published in the American Anthropologist, although there are numerous subsequent posthumous publications, such as the monumental Yurok Myths (1976) and, as late as 1998, the handsome volume The Archaeology and Pottery of Nazca, Peru.

Theodora Kroeber’s Ishi in Two Worlds (1961) was her first attempt (at the age of 60) at biography and history; the latest edition (University of California Press, 2002) contains a new foreword by Karl Kroeber that includes details of the circumstances, especially the decisive role played by Robert Heizer, that led Theodora Kroeber to write the book. In “The Hunter, Ishi” (1962), she contrasts Ishi’s manner of hunting as contrary to modern hunting practices with the essential similarity between his modes of fishing and those of contemporary anglers to highlight her interest in what makes adapting to an alien culture possible or very difficult. In “About History” (1963), she describes the historical

-401-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Ishi in Three Centuries
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 416

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.