James River Chiefdoms: The Rise of Social Inequality in the Chesapeake

By Martin D. Gallivan | Go to book overview

Acknowledgments

This work behind this book, a revision of my doctoral dissertation, reflects the efforts and support of many people and several institutions.

I would first like to thank the members of my doctoral committee— Jeffrey Hantman, Stephen Plog, Patricia Wattenmaker, and Fred Damon—for the insights and training they offered me at the University of Virginia. I owe a tremendous debt to Jeff Hantman, my dissertation committee chair, who provided me with the essential foundations of anthropological archaeology and the support that allowed me to meet the challenges of interpreting the prehistoric James River Valley. Whether I needed a tighter research design or a good meal, Jeff (and the whole Hantman family) have given repeatedly without hesitation. Steve Plog has also been especially supportive of my research and instrumental in shaping my approach to the archaeological record by encouraging a consideration of social change grounded in quantitative analysis. Pati Wattenmaker and Fred Damon furnished me with critical guidance in conducting anthropological research. I thank Fraser Neiman of the Thomas Jefferson Memorial Foundation, and now the University of Virginia’s Department of Anthropology, who served as the outside reviewer on my dissertation committee.

The research presented here may be placed, I hope, within the tradition of an integrative approach to anthropology that thrives within the University of Virginia’s Department of Anthropology. Several archaeologists from this tradition played an important role in shaping my understanding of North American archaeology. Michael Klein’s research provided a model for this study by demonstrating the interpretive power that flows from a regional data set in which archaeological features serve as a fundamental unit of analysis. In response to my countless queries, Mike patiently steered me to the rich archaeological resources of the region and the principles needed to interpret them. Much of this research springs from Mike’s efforts to develop a systematic ceramic chronology for the region and from his study of architectural patterning in the Chesapeake. Other influential “ancestors” who have pursued the archaeological study of Virginia’s Indians alongside Mike at the University of Virginia include Gary Dunham and Thomas Klatka.

I have benefited from my continuing conversations with the University

-xv-

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