Woman, Native, Other: Writing Postcoloniality and Feminism

By Trinh T. Minh-Ha | Go to book overview

Notes

I. Commitment from the Mirror-Writing Box

1. Virginia Woolf, Women and Writing (New York: Harcourt Brace Jovanovich, 1979), p. 54.

2. Tillie Olsen, Silences (1978, rpt. New York: Delta/Seymour Lawrence Ed., 1980), pp. 13, 39.

3. Denise Paulme, ed., Women of Tropical Africa, tr. H. M. Wright (1963, rpt. Berkeley: Univ. of California Press, 1974), p. 2.

4. hattie gossett, “Who Told You Anybody Wants To Hear From You? You Ain’t Nothing But a Black Woman!” This Bridge Called My Back: Writings by Radical Women of Color, ed. Cherrie Morraga & Gloria Anzaldúa (Watertown, Mass.: Persephone Press, 1981), p. 175.

5. Gloria Anzaldúa, “Speaking in Tongues: A Letter to 3rd World Women Writers,” This Bridge, p. 166.

6. Sylvia Plath, The Bell Jar (1971, rpt. New York: Bantam Books, 1981), see Biographical Note by Lois Ames, p. 211.

7. Emma Santos, L’Itinéraire psychiatrique (Paris: Des Femmes, 1977), pp. 46–47. For previous quotes see pp. 47, 50, 125 (my translations).

8. Toni Cade Bambara, “What It Is I Think I’m Doing Anyhow,” The Writer on Her Work, ed. J. Sternburg (New York: W. W. Norton, 1980), p. 167.

9. “Commitment: Toni Cade Bambara Speaks,” interview with Beverly GuySheftall in Sturdy Black Bridges: Visions of Black Women in Literature, ed. R. P. Bell, B. J. Parker, & B. Guy-Sheftall (New York: Anchor/Doubleday, 1979), p. 232.

10. Ezekiel Mphahlele, Voices in the Whirlwind (New York: Hill & Wang, 1972), pp. 186–87.

11. Ibid., p. 196.

12. Franz Fanon, Black Skin White Masks, tr. Charles Lam Markmann (New York: Grove Press, 1967), p. 8.

13. Jean-Paul Sartre, Situations, II. Qu’est-ce que la littérature? (Paris: Gallimard, 1948), pp. 112, 97.

14. Margaret Walker, “On Being Female, Black, and Free,” The Writer and Her Work, pp. 95, 102, 106.

15. Jacques Rabemananjara, “Le Poète noir et son peuple,” Présence Africaine, no. 16 (Oct.-Nov. 1957), pp. 10–13.

16. Aimé Césaire, Return to My Native Land (Paris: Présence Africaine, 1971), pp. 60–62.

17. Nikki Giovanni, Gemini: An Extended Autobiographical Statement on My First Twenty-Five Years of Being a Black Poet (New York: Viking Press, 1971), pp. 95–96.

18. Alice Walker, “Saving The Life That Is Your Own: The Importance of Models in The Artist’s Life,” The Third Woman: Minority Women Writers of The United States, ed. D. Fisher (Boston: Houghton Mifflin, 1980), p. 158.

19. Wole Soyinka, Myth, Literature, and the African World (New York: Cambridge Univ. Press, 1976), p. 138.

20. Mphahlele, Voices in the Whirlwind, p. 189.

-153-

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Woman, Native, Other: Writing Postcoloniality and Feminism
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • The Story Began Long Ago … 1
  • I - Commitment from the Mirror-Writing Box 5
  • II - The Language of Nativism- Anthropology as a Scientific Conversation of Man with Man 47
  • III - Difference- "A Special Third World Women Issue" 79
  • IV - Grandma’s Story 119
  • Notes 153
  • Selected Bibliography 161
  • Index 169
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