Woman, Native, Other: Writing Postcoloniality and Feminism

By Trinh T. Minh-Ha | Go to book overview

Index
Afonja, Simi: on African women and tradition, 114
Africa: propaganda and commitment, 11; power and language, 49, 52; women and westernization, 107–108; women and tradition, 114; griot and griotte, 120, 126, 148; oral tradition and storytelling, 125– 26, 148; women and regeneration, 127, 136; women and magic, 128, 136; structure of story, 143
Alaska: storytelling, 125
Alienation: writing and objectivity, 27; anthropology, 58
American Indian. See Indian, American
Androgyny: writing, 39
Anthropology: worn codes, 47–49; language and nativism, 49, 52–54; objectivity, 55; as western science, 55–59; as mythology, 59–64; as semiology, 64–67; as gossip, 67–68; as voyeurism, 68–70; as fiction, 70–72; interpretation, 71–73; language, 73–74, 76; compared to history, 84; authenticity, 88, 94; sex and gender, 105; gender and economics, 107; structure of story, 141; cultural anthropology, 157n
Anzaldúa, Gloria: on women and writing, 8; Third World women and difference, 83
Apartheid: ideology and difference, 84; pass laws, 90. See also South Africa
Aristotle: defined anthropology as gossip, 68; poetry, history, and truth, 120
Art engagé: Third World literary discourse, 11–12
Assimilation: anthropology, 60–61
Atwood, Margaret: on women writers and sexism, 27
Authenticity: and specialness, 88; and roots, 89–90, 94
Authority: women and storytelling, 122
Awori, Thelma: women and African culture, 108
Ba, A. Hampate: on oral tradition, 126; on speech and power, 127–28, 132
Bambara, Toni Cade: on writing as community service, 9–10, 15; on writing as work, 10; on writing and language, 17
Barthes, Roland: clarity and language, 17; on function of writing, 18; writing and the body, 41; structure of story, 143
Basaa: women and regeneration, 136
de Beauvoir, Simone: women as writers, 18; female identity, 97; difference and the body, 100–101
Bible: women and I Corinthians 14:35, 30
Bir: women and magic
Bisexuality: writing, 39; ear as symbol, 127
Blanchot, Maurice: knowledge and power, 40, 43
Body: women and writing, 36–39; theory and writing, 39–44; as basis for difference, 100
Bricolage: engineer contradiction and anthropology, 62–63, 156n
Briffault, Robert: magic and gender, 128
Brossard, Nicole: on the body and writing, 36–37
Buddhism: reality and language, 61. See also Zen
Butwa: women and magic, 128
Cameroon: women and regeneration, 136
Capitalism: women in Gabon, 108. See also Economics; Separate development
Cather, Katherine Dunlap: on storytelling and religion, 124
Celebes: women and magic, 128
Césaire, Aimé: on function of art, 13, 15
Cha, Theresa Hak Kyung: on story and storytelling, 119, 122, 123, 126; on truth, 121
Chang, Diana: on writing and authorship, 36
Cheng-tao-ke: verses of and difference, 95– 96
Childbearing: images and writing, 37
Children: storytelling, 124–25
China: yin and yang concept, 67; Julia Kristeva on male/female difference, 103, 116; warrior woman and story, 133–34
Christian, Barbara: gender, 159n
Chuang Tzu: mirror as image, 23
Civilization: storytelling and the primitive, 123–25
Civilized: connotation and storytelling, 124–25, 126, 129
Cixous, Hélène: on sexism and women writers, 27, 37; on writing and author,

-169-

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Woman, Native, Other: Writing Postcoloniality and Feminism
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • The Story Began Long Ago … 1
  • I - Commitment from the Mirror-Writing Box 5
  • II - The Language of Nativism- Anthropology as a Scientific Conversation of Man with Man 47
  • III - Difference- "A Special Third World Women Issue" 79
  • IV - Grandma’s Story 119
  • Notes 153
  • Selected Bibliography 161
  • Index 169
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