The Feminine Symptom: Aleatory Matter in the Aristotelian Cosmos

By Emanuela Bianchi | Go to book overview

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS

This project has had such a long gestation that it is impossible to acknowledge adequately all those who have contributed one way or another to its genesis. At the very least, I should say that I am profoundly grateful to a bevy of brilliant and generous interlocutors, mentors, readers, and friends for their support and feedback, as well as for the invaluable institutional backing, without which this work could not have been accomplished.

Thank you to Richard Bernstein, Judith Butler, and Dmitri Nikulin for their immensely helpful critiques when this project was in its early stages. In particular, Judith Butler and Kaja Silverman’s seminars in the Rhetoric Department at UC Berkeley were formative for my thinking in this book. I am grateful to the UNC Charlotte Department of Philosophy, in particular Michael Kelly, Marvin Croy, and Nancy Gutierrez for granting me space and time for research and writing, including sponsoring my stay at the University of Dundee. A semester spent at the University of Dundee as a Humanities Research Fellow enabled great progress on the manuscript, and I thank the School of Humanities and the Philosophy faculty, especially Rachel Jones, for providing a rich and productive intellectual environment. At New York University I owe Jacques Lezra, chair of the Comparative Literature Department, Joy Connolly, Dean of Humanities, and the Humanities Initiative many thanks for both moral and financial support throughout the publication process, and Susan Protheroe for all kinds of material assistance. I am also deeply grateful for the unstinting support and mentorship over the years of Judith Butler, Drucilla Cornell, Kaja Silverman, and Walter Brogan.

Earlier versions of parts of this book were delivered as papers at meetings of the Ancient Philosophy Society, the Society for Phenomenology

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