Spaces of Conflict, Sounds of Solidarity: Music, Race, and Spatial Entitlement in Los Angeles

By Gaye Theresa Johnson | Go to book overview

Acknowledgments

It’s one of the simplest sentences in the world, just four
words, but they’re the four hugest words in the world when
they’re put together: You Can DO It.

—Sherman Alexie

This book has been many projects and has had many lives, but it is what it is because of my people, my pueblo querido that includes family and compañeros from around the world.

First, a shout-out to all the people who came to my talks over the years, who aren’t academics, who grew up on or wrote the music I write about, or who witnessed or participated in the movements I examine. Many times I recall your excitement about my work. I wish I knew all your names, so I could say thank you directly for affirming that what I was writing was true for the most important folks: the ones who were there.

Fellowships from the UC President’s Postdoctoral Fellowship Program, the Center for the Critical Study of Race and Ethnicity at Stanford, the Interdisciplinary Humanities Center and the Institute for Social, Behavioral, and Economic Research at UCSB, and the UCSB Center for Black Studies allowed me the time and resources to complete this project and begin the next one. This project began under the guidance of David W. Noble: my advisor, friend, and source of constant intellectual inspiration and kindness. Gail Noble’s encouragement and support is, also, greatly cherished and admired. Thank you to the entire staff at the UCLA Special Collections, Southern California Research Library, and USC Special Collections, who were very helpful over the years, and also to Sylvia Curtis and Sherri Barnes at UCSB for their research assistance at critical moments.

-203-

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