The Art of Found Objects: Interviews with Texas Artists

By Robert Craig Bunch | Go to book overview

Laura Jean Lacy

Received July 18, 2012
Born 1932, Washington, DC; lives in Dallas

Figure 43. Laura Jean Lacy, Biggie’s Last Supper, 2008

Mixed media, painted cutouts, found objects on velvet, 21⅜" × 25⅜"

Courtesy of the artist

Photograph: Andy Reisberg, Photographic Archives Lab
and Gallery, Dallas

Q How did growing up in Washington, DC, contribute to your social consciousness and growth as an artist?

A I grew in the heart of black academia in Washington, DC, where my father worked at Howard University. Living at Howard University, I was introduced to the philosophical thoughts, writings, and art of African American intelligentsia such as Alan Locke and W. E. B. Dubois. I was raised in a family that understood the importance of exposure to history, art, and culture. I attended the King Smith Art School, where I studied visual arts, music, dance, and piano. I saw images created by black artists at Howard University and the local YMCA and also enjoyed going to the National Gallery of Art and the Smithsonian. All of this impacted me in the early years of my life. All this provided the impetus for my journey to become a visual artist.

Q How did living in greater Los Angeles throughout the 1960s contribute to your social consciousness and growth as an artist?

A In Los Angeles in the sixties a cadre of fantastic artists whose work reflected the changing mood of the nation surrounded me. Included were artists such as Charles White, Betye Saar, Bernie Casey, Noah Purifoy, John Outterbridge, and many others. It is in Los Angeles that I began creating liturgical art; working with my ex-husband, a Methodist minister, I produced a series of collages that helped white and black congregations grapple with the issues of the civil rights movement. The challenges and influences of black life in Los Angeles shaped my ever-evolving style, worked by the depiction of contemporary black life in the urban enclaves of the United

-98-

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The Art of Found Objects: Interviews with Texas Artists
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Acknowledgments ix
  • Introduction 1
  • Margaret Adie 9
  • Helen Altman 12
  • Celia Álvarez Muñoz 14
  • The Art Guys- Michael Galbreth 17
  • Jack Massing 19
  • Frances Bagley 22
  • Karin Broker 25
  • Maureen Brouillette 28
  • Steve Brudniak 31
  • Margarita Cabrera 35
  • Eugene W. R. Campbell Jr 38
  • Danville Chadbourne 40
  • Claire Cusack 46
  • Robert Dampier 48
  • Roberto del Rio 51
  • Martin Delabano 54
  • Vernon Fisher 58
  • Trenton Doyle Hancock 60
  • Vincent Hannemann 62
  • Ann Harithas 66
  • Dana Harper 69
  • Joseph Havel 71
  • Tracy Hicks 73
  • Paul Horn 77
  • Otis Huband 79
  • Christopher Hynes 81
  • Barbara Irwin 83
  • Joy Jenkins 85
  • Norman Kary 89
  • Mimi Kato 93
  • Sharon Kopriva 96
  • Laura Jean Lacy 98
  • Marilyn Lanfear 101
  • Lance Letscher 104
  • Ken Little 106
  • Bert L. Long Jr 111
  • Jesse Lott 115
  • Edward Lane McCartney 117
  • Mary McCleary 121
  • Leila McConnell 124
  • Kelly O’Connor 127
  • Mari Omori 129
  • Kathleen Packlick 131
  • Angelica Paez 134
  • Kevin Parmer 136
  • Forrest Prince 139
  • Russell Prince 142
  • Dario Robleto 144
  • Aaron Roe 147
  • Jonathan Rosenstein 149
  • John Mark Sager 151
  • Joel Sampson 154
  • Ward Sanders 156
  • Luke Savisky 158
  • Kelly Sears 163
  • Al Souza 165
  • Julie Speed 167
  • James Michael Starr 169
  • Henry Stein 173
  • Gary Sweeney 175
  • Cecil Touchon 177
  • Patrick Turk 181
  • Janet L. Waldrop 184
  • Debbie Wetmore 186
  • Steve Wiman 188
  • Sources and Further Reading 191
  • Index 199
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