The Routledge Concise History of Southeast Asian Writing in English

By Rajeev S. Patke; Philip Holden | Go to book overview

7
Poetry 1965–1990

Overview

By the 1960s, the writers of Anglophone Southeast Asia had begun giving steady proof that poetry in English had come to stay. In the Philippines, the consolidation of literary trends already established before the Second World War was followed by the rapid assimilation of American tutelage in the craft of writing, and this in turn was followed by the consolidation of the canon-formation that had begun in the preceding decades. In Malaysia and Singapore, local traditions came to their first maturity after 1965 in the shadow of two very different kinds of public discourse about the formation of new nationhood and the role of English in its development, while in Hong Kong a small body of expatriate poetry made itself heard in a period which brought rapid economic and demographic growth to the colony. The circumstances of poetic writing differed from one region to another: in the Philippines, poets had taken in earnest to English half a century earlier than their counterparts in Malaysia and Singapore, while in Hong Kong, poetry in English would not be attempted by writers born in Hong Kong till the end of the twentieth century.


The comparative dimension

The writing scene in the Philippines differed from its counterparts in Anglophone Southeast Asia in several other respects: writers had access to, and often utilized, a range of multilingual creative options; English was assimilated fairly quickly by a relatively large proportion of the population; writers in English were able to access systematic opportunities for instruction in creative writing, at home and overseas, as part of their literary education; and the literary productivity in English from the Philippines is on a scale unmatched elsewhere in Southeast Asia, not only for sheer quantity, but also for variety, range and overall fluency.

Two additional factors are significant: many Filipinos are writers first and poets second, in the sense that neither the genre nor the language they write in is necessarily singular: most write poems and fiction, many write in

-100-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Routledge Concise History of Southeast Asian Writing in English
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • The Routledge Concise History of Southeast Asian Writing in English i
  • Routledge Concise Histories of Literature Series ii
  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Illustrations ix
  • Acknowledgments x
  • 1 - Introduction 1
  • 2 - Historical Contexts 9
  • 3 - Linguistic Contexts 28
  • 4 - Malaysian and Singaporean Writing to 1965 43
  • 5 - Filipino Writing to 1965 62
  • 6 - Narrative Fiction 1965–1990 81
  • 7 - Poetry 1965–1990 100
  • 8 - Drama 1965–1990 125
  • 9 - Expatriate, Diasporic and Minoritarian Writing 137
  • 10 - Contemporary Fiction 1990–2008 151
  • 11 - Contemporary Poetry 1990–2008 165
  • 12 - Contemporary Drama 1990–2008 190
  • 13 - From the Contemporary to the Future 203
  • Works Cited 217
  • Guide to Further Reading 236
  • Glossary of Terms 252
  • Index 257
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 272

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.